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New gene editing method may help correct muscular dystrophy

August 15, 2014 10:52 am | by University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center | Comments

Univ. of Texas Southwestern Medical Center researchers successfully used a new gene editing method to correct a mutation that leads to Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) in a mouse model of the condition. Researchers used a technique called CRISPR/Cas9-mediated genome editing, which can precisely remove a mutation in DNA, allowing the body's DNA repair mechanisms to ...

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Laser makes microscopes way cooler

August 15, 2014 10:31 am | by EurekAlert! | Comments

Laser physicists have found a way to make atomic-force microscope probes 20 times more sensitive and capable of detecting forces as small as the weight of an individual virus. The technique, developed by researchers at The Australian National University (ANU), hinges on ...

Memories of errors foster faster learning

August 15, 2014 10:18 am | by EurekAlert! | Comments

Using a deceptively simple set of experiments, researchers at Johns Hopkins have learned why people learn an identical or similar task faster the second, third and subsequent time around. The reason: They are aided not only by memories of how to perform the task, but also by memories of the errors made the first time.

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Scientists fold RNA origami from a single strand

August 15, 2014 9:51 am | by EurekAlert! | Comments

RNA origami is a new method for organizing molecules on the nanoscale. Using just a single strand of RNA, many complicated shapes can be fabricated by this technique. Unlike existing methods for folding DNA molecules, RNA origamis are produced by enzymes and they simultaneously fold into pre-designed shapes. These features may allow designer RNA structures to ...

UT Arlington and Pediatrix partner to bring simulation training direct to practice

August 15, 2014 9:45 am | by EurekAlert! | Comments

A real-time video feed, a laptop and a computerized manikin baby are key components for a new simulation training initiative that allows UT Arlington College of Nursing educators to put Neonatal Nurse Practitioners (NNPs) and physicians through the paces of an emergency scenario from hundreds of miles away.

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Coatings for Medical Devices Market Report - Global Forecasts 2020

August 15, 2014 9:32 am | by The Associated Press | Comments

Research and Markets ( http://www.researchandmarkets.com/research/wz6v6m/coatings_for ) has announced the addition of the "Coatings for Medical Devices - Global Strategic Business Report" report to their offering. This report analyzes...

Cook Medical Enrolls First Patient in Zilver PTX Drug Eluting Peripheral Stent Clinical Study in China

August 15, 2014 8:30 am | by The Associated Press | Comments

BLOOMINGTON, Ind.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Aug 15, 2014--Cook Medical has enrolled the first patient in the clinical study in China of its Zilver® PTX® Drug Eluting Peripheral Stent. The case was performed by one of the study’s principal investigators, Prof. Peng Liu, M.D., at the China-Japan Friendship...

CVD Reports 108% Order Increase in Q2

August 14, 2014 7:29 pm | by The Associated Press | Comments

CENTRAL ISLIP, N.Y.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Aug 14, 2014--CVD Equipment Corporation (NASDAQ: CVV ), a leading provider of custom chemical vapor deposition systems, today announced its financial results for the three and six months ended June 30, 2014. CVD reported new orders of approximately...

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Scripps Research Institute chemists uncover powerful new click chemistry reactivity

August 14, 2014 4:23 pm | by EurekAlert! | Comments

Chemists led by Nobel laureate K. Barry Sharpless at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have used his click chemistry to uncover unprecedented, powerful reactivity for making new drugs, diagnostics, plastics, smart materials and many other products. The new SuFEx—Sulfur Fluoride Exchange—reactions enable ...

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New non-invasive technique controls size of molecules penetrating the blood-brain barrier

August 14, 2014 4:14 pm | by EurekAlert! | Comments

A new technique developed by Elisa Konofagou, professor of biomedical engineering and radiology at Columbia Engineering, has demonstrated for the first time that the size of molecules penetrating the blood-brain barrier (BBB) can be controlled using acoustic pressure—the pressure of an ultrasound beam—to let specific molecules through.

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Scientists use lasers to control mouse brain switchboard

August 14, 2014 3:21 pm | by EurekAlert! | Comments

Ever wonder why it's hard to focus after a bad night's sleep? Using mice and flashes of light, scientists show that just a few nerve cells in the brain may control the switch between internal thoughts and external distractions. The study, partly funded by the National Institutes of Health, may be a breakthrough in understanding how a critical part of the brain, called the thalamic reticular nucleus (TRN), influences consciousness.

Inside the cell, an ocean of buffeting waves

August 14, 2014 3:11 pm | by EurekAlert! | Comments

Conventional wisdom holds that the cytoplasm of mammalian cells is a viscous fluid, with organelles and proteins suspended within it, jiggling against one another and drifting at random. However, a new biophysical study led by researchers at Harvard University challenges this model and reveals that those drifting objects are subject to a very different type of environment.

Single gene controls jet lag

August 14, 2014 2:54 pm | by EurekAlert! | Comments

Scientists at the Salk Institute for Biological Studies have identified a gene that regulates sleep and wake rhythms. The discovery of the role of this gene, called Lhx1, provides scientists with a potential therapeutic target to help ...

Edison Nation Medical Announces Innovation Search To Improve Hazardous Waste Disposal in Hospitals & Healthcare Facilities

August 14, 2014 2:35 pm | by PR Newswire | Comments

CHARLOTTE, N.C., Aug. 14, 2014 /PRNewswire/ -- Edison Nation Medical, a health care innovation marketplace, today announced a worldwide search for ideas to improve the disposal of hazardous waste material in hospitals and healthcare facilities. The search seeks to address one of the...

Immune cell discovery could help to halt cancer spread

August 14, 2014 2:32 pm | by EurekAlert! | Comments

Melbourne researchers have revealed the critical importance of highly specialised immune cells, called natural killer cells, in killing melanoma cells that have spread to the lungs. These natural killer cells could be harnessed to hunt down and kill cancers that have spread in the body.

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