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Congress Takes Aim at the Device Tax

January 15, 2015 11:00 am | by AAMI | Comments

The long-running fight to repeal the 2.3% medical device excise tax has taken center stage with a new Republican-led Congress in session and the introduction of bills in both chambers to kill it.The tax, designed to help fund President Obama’s...

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Philips and Indica Labs Team Up for Advanced Image Analysis of Cancer

January 15, 2015 10:52 am | by Philips | Comments

Royal Philips today announced that it will further support oncology researchers’ efforts to analyze pathology samples by offering advanced image analysis algorithms from Indica Labs, Inc. as part of its Digital Pathology Solutions offerings...

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Johns Hopkins Lab Receives Funding to Develop Retinal Prosthesis

January 15, 2015 10:20 am | by Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory | Comments

The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (APL), in Laurel, Maryland, has received $4 million in funding from the Mann Fund to develop a next-generation retinal prosthesis system. The Mann Fund was created by philanthropist...

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Short Nanowires Most Effective for Inserting Electrodes into the Brain

January 15, 2015 10:02 am | by Lund University | Comments

If in the future electrodes are inserted into the human brain - either for research purposes or to treat diseases - it may be appropriate to give them a 'coat' of nanowires that could make them less irritating for the brain tissue. However...

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Brain Imaging Test for Autism Spectrum Disorder

January 15, 2015 9:50 am | by Virginia Tech | Comments

Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute scientists have developed a brain-imaging technique that may be able to identify children with autism spectrum disorder in just two minutes. This test, while far from being used as the clinical standard...

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Penn Engineers Develop 'Triple Threat' Graphene Biosensor

January 14, 2015 1:53 pm | by Even Lerner, University of Pennsylvania | Comments

Biosensors—electronic devices that can detect the presence of proteins and other biological molecules—have a wide variety of applications, from medical diagnostics, to food safety, to security and law enforcement. But current biosensors need to...

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Advanced 3-D Facial Imaging Can Help Detect Autism

January 14, 2015 11:55 am | by University of Missouri - Columbia | Comments

Autism is a spectrum of closely related disorders diagnosed in patients who exhibit a shared core of symptoms, including delays in learning to communicate and interact socially. Early detection of autism in children is the key for treatments to be...

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Tattoo-Like Sensor Measures Glucose Levels Without Painful Finger Prick

January 14, 2015 11:02 am | by American Chemical Society | Comments

Scientists have developed the first ultra-thin, flexible device that sticks to skin like a rub-on tattoo and can detect a person's glucose levels. The sensor, reported in a proof-of-concept study in the ACS journal Analytical Chemistry, has...

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Using DNA 'Glue' To Build Tissues and Organs

January 14, 2015 10:54 am | by American Chemical Society | Comments

DNA molecules provide the "source code" for life in humans, plants, animals and some microbes. But now researchers report an initial study showing that the strands can also act as a glue to hold together 3-D-printed materials that could someday...

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University and Hospitals Collaborate to Find Healthcare Solutions

January 14, 2015 9:58 am | by Universidad Carlos III de Madrid - Oficina de Información Científica | Comments

A prototype for doing a skin biopsy in 5 minutes and a simulator for training doctors in minimally invasive surgery are some of the innovative projects in the process of being patented that have arisen from the relationship between the university...

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Measuring Concussion Forces in the Greatest Detail Yet

January 14, 2015 9:33 am | by Bjorn Carey, Stanford News Service | Comments

More than 40 million people worldwide suffer from concussions each year, but scientists are just beginning to understand the traumatic forces that cause the injury. Now a team of engineers and physicians at Stanford has provided the...

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Computer Model Calculates Public Response to Disease Outbreaks

January 14, 2015 9:19 am | by David L. Chandler, MIT News Office | Comments

Sometimes the response to the outbreak of a disease can make things worse — such as when people panic and flee, potentially spreading the disease to new areas. The ability to anticipate when such overreactions might occur could help public...

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First Contracting Human Muscle Grown in a Lab

January 14, 2015 9:08 am | by Ken Kingery, Duke University | Comments

In a laboratory first, Duke researchers have grown human skeletal muscle that contracts and responds just like native tissue to external stimuli such as electrical pulses, biochemical signals and pharmaceuticals. The lab-grown tissue should soon...

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Device Manipulates Differentiating Stem Cells

January 14, 2015 8:51 am | by Northwestern University | Comments

Electroporation is a powerful technique in molecular biology. By using an electrical pulse to create a temporary nanopore in a cell membrane, researchers can deliver chemicals, drugs, and DNA directly into a single cell. But existing electroporation...

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Video Game Technology Measures Movement in Muscular Dystrophy Patients

January 13, 2015 2:00 pm | by Nationwide Children's Hospital | Comments

Researchers at Nationwide Children's Hospital have developed a way to measure upper extremity movement in patients with muscular dystrophy using interactive video game technology. Their hope is to expand inclusion criteria for clinical trials...

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