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First-Ever Images of Molecular Machine Responsible for Bacterial Infections

March 10, 2015 10:29 am | by University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston | Comments

Armed with a microscope capable of zooming in on organisms measured in billionths of a meter, scientists report they are the first to observe one of the tiny molecular machines that bacteria use to infect host cells. Findings appear in the...

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Smartphone App Uses ResearchKit to Study Heart Health

March 10, 2015 10:02 am | by Tracie White, Stanford Medicine | Comments

A free iPhone app allows users to contribute to a study of human heart health while learning about the health of their own hearts, and uses a new software framework developed by Apple. Researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine...

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Photos of the Day: X-rays for the Developing World

March 10, 2015 9:47 am | by Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne | Comments

In developing countries, many hospitals have become cemeteries of medical equipment. Several radiology systems, often sent by international aid, may never be used due to the climatic conditions and the instability of electricity networks...

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Genes for Type 1 Diabetes Can't Hide Anymore

March 10, 2015 8:58 am | by University of Florida Health | Comments

A research group that includes a University of Florida genetics expert has located and narrowed down the number of genes that play a role in the disease, according to a study published Monday in the journal Nature Genetics. Knowing the...

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Laboratory Developed Testing Provides Precise Results

March 10, 2015 8:53 am | by BCC Research | Comments

BCC Research reveals in its new report on laboratory-developed testing (LDTs), the market within the U.S. will grow from $9.7 billion in 2014 to about $17.7 billion in 2019, with a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 12.7%. In the realm of...

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Engineering Custom Red Blood Cells

March 9, 2015 4:04 pm | by Johns Hopkins Medicine | Comments

Researchers at Johns Hopkins have successfully corrected a genetic error in stem cells from patients with sickle cell disease, and then used those cells to grow mature red blood cells, they report. The study represents an important step toward...

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3D Imaging Technology Can Observe Living Cells

March 9, 2015 3:23 pm | by Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne | Comments

The major limitation of microscopy is light itself: if we want to see an object smaller than the wavelength of visible light, we cannot use conventional optics. When it comes to imaging cells, the problems compound, since cells often require...

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Nanoparticles Help Put an End to Corneal Transplant Rejection

March 9, 2015 1:38 pm | by Johns Hopkins University | Comments

There are about 48,000 corneal transplants done each year in the U.S., compared to approximately 16,000 kidney transplants and 2,100 heart transplants. Out of the 48,000 corneal transplants done, 10 percent of them end up in rejection, largely...

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Quick, Easy and Early Diagnosis with Rare Earth Ions

March 9, 2015 1:32 pm | by University of Copenhagen - Faculty of Science | Comments

Lack of oxygen in cells is an indicator of diseases as serious as cerebral hemorrhages, stroke and cancer. Regrettably measuring real-time oxygen concentration in living tissue is difficult with current technologies. Now a chemist from the...

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Space Shuttle's Robotic Arm to Assist Child Surgery

March 9, 2015 1:27 pm | by Canadian Space Agency | Comments

Today, Industry Minister James Moore visited The Hospital for Sick Children (SickKids) in Toronto to witness first-hand how Canada's investment in space science research and development will be used to help drive improvements to surgical care...

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Fluid-Based Gating Mechanism for Filtering Blood and Fluid Samples

March 9, 2015 10:38 am | by Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard | Comments

In nature, pores can continuously control how a living organism absorbs or excretes fluids, vapors and solids in response to its environment; for example, tiny holes invisible to the naked eye called stomata cover a plant's leaves and stems as...

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Mobile App Provides User-Friendly Platform for Blood Donors

March 9, 2015 10:32 am | by New York Blood Center | Comments

New York Blood Center (NYBC) recently launched a new mobile app providing a convenient, user friendly platform for blood donors to find donation locations, make and manage appointments, view donation history and donor profiles, and access...

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Wireless Sensors for Treatment of Obesity and Diabetes

March 9, 2015 10:28 am | by Gentag, Inc. | Comments

Mayo Clinic and Gentag, Inc. have reached an agreement to develop the next generation of wearable biosensors designed to fight obesity and diabetes. “We are hoping that this technology will be game-changer. These patch biosensors may help us...

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Prize-Winning Two-Photon Microscopy Examines Individual Neuron Function

March 9, 2015 9:52 am | by Grete Lundbeck European Brain Research Foundation | Comments

The world's most valuable (€1m) neuroscience prize, The Brain Prize has been awarded, to four scientists, Winfried Denk and Arthur Konnerth (Germany), and Karel Svoboda and David Tank (USA), for the invention and development of two-photon...

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'Heart-on-a-Chip' Could Replace Animal Testing for Drug Screening

March 9, 2015 9:16 am | by University of California - Berkeley | Comments

When University of California, Berkeley, bioengineers say they are holding their hearts in the palms of their hands, they are not talking about emotional vulnerability. Instead, the research team led by bioengineering professor Kevin Healy...

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