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Sensor Detects Spoiled Meat

April 15, 2015 10:11 am | by Anne Trafton, MIT News Office | Comments

MIT chemists have devised an inexpensive, portable sensor that can detect gases emitted by rotting meat, allowing consumers to determine whether the meat in their grocery store or refrigerator is safe to eat. The sensor, which consists of...

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FDA Finalizes Program to Speed Access to Devices for Gravely Ill Patients

April 15, 2015 10:02 am | by AAMI | Comments

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has introduced a program intended to give gravely ill patients earlier access to certain high-risk devices. Designed to help those with conditions for which no treatments exist, or that are serious...

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Lab-on-a-Chip Rapidly Detects Opportunistic Chinese Parasite

April 15, 2015 9:46 am | by American Institute of Physics (AIP) | Comments

For a healthy individual, an infection of Cryptosporidium parvum may mean nothing more than a few days of bad diarrhea. For someone with a compromised immune system, it can mean death, following an excruciating, protracted bout of watery...

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UV Light Robot Could Help Stop Spread of 'Superbugs'

April 15, 2015 9:37 am | by Texas A&M University | Comments

Can a robot clean a hospital room just as well as a person? According to new research out of the Texas A&M Health Science Center College of Medicine, that is indeed the case. Chetan Jinadatha, M.D., M.P.H., assistant professor at the Texas A&M...

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Wristband May Help Predict Response to Antidepressants

April 15, 2015 9:33 am | by Medical College of Georgia at Georgia Regents University | Comments

A wristband that records motion throughout a 24-hour cycle may be an inexpensive, safe way to determine which patients with major depressive disorder will respond best to commonly prescribed drugs such as Prozac. Selective serotonin reuptake...

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Device Makes Injections Less Painful

April 14, 2015 4:28 pm | by Rice University | Comments

If the Rice University freshman engineering design team Comfortably Numb has it their way, children will be less fearful and feel less pain when they go to the doctor’s office for a shot. The trio of freshmen has created a device to ease the...

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Ping-Pong Ball Sized Device Provides Pain-Free Blood Tests

April 14, 2015 4:22 pm | by University of Wisconsin-Madison | Comments

A company with deep roots at UW-Madison wants to make blood sampling less painful and more convenient. Tasso Inc. is perfecting a device the size of a pingpong ball that extracts a small sample while held against the skin for two minutes...

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Toothbrush Training Video Game Employs 'Selfie Assessment'

April 14, 2015 11:18 am | by PR Newswire | Comments

Last year, Brush Up, the toothbrush training game, revealed extraordinary results based on its sensor-enabled bluetooth toothbrush. The hardware provides real-time assessment of brushing performance. At the 2015 HIMSS conference, the game's...

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World's Smallest Pacemaker Receives CE Mark

April 14, 2015 10:54 am | by Medtronic | Comments

Medtronic plc today announced it has received CE (Conformité Européenne) Mark of the Micra Transcatheter Pacing System (TPS), the world's smallest pacemaker. At less than one-tenth the size of traditional pacemakers, the Micra device provides...

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Using 'Guts-in-a-Dish' to Fight Nasty Digestive Bugs

April 14, 2015 10:50 am | by University of Michigan Health System | Comments

If you got hit with any of the 'intestinal bugs' that went around this winter, you've felt the effects of infectious microbes on your digestive system. But scientists don't fully understand what's going on in gut infections like that - or...

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App Could Help Older Adults with Memory Loss

April 14, 2015 10:36 am | by Lauren Ingram, Pennsylvania State University | Comments

From time to time, forgetting to pay a bill, misplacing car keys or searching for reading glasses (while you’re wearing them) can be an irritating, yet normal, part of life. But for people over the age of 60, memory loss that encroaches into daily...

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Encapsulated Stem Cells Accelerate Wound Healing

April 14, 2015 10:30 am | by Merry R. Buckley, Cornell University | Comments

A team of Cornell scientists has shown that stem cells confined inside tiny capsules secrete substances that help heal simulated wounds in cell cultures, opening up new ways of delivering these substances to locations in the body where they...

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How Deep-Brain Stimulation Reshapes Neural Circuits in Parkinson’s Disease

April 14, 2015 9:57 am | by University of California - San Francisco | Comments

UC San Francisco scientists have discovered a possible mechanism for how deep-brain stimulation (DBS), a widely used treatment for movement disorders, exerts its therapeutic effects. Few medical treatments show results as rapid and dramatic...

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App Monitors Frequent Fliers' Radiation Exposure

April 14, 2015 9:50 am | by Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) | Comments

Frequent fliers are now able to monitor their personal radiation exposure when flying using the TrackYourDose app. Behind the app lies intensive research work undertaken by the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB). Since 1997 PTB has...

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'Asleep-Yet-Aware' Remote Wireless Sensors

April 14, 2015 9:36 am | by DARPA | Comments

State-of-the-art military sensors today rely on “active electronics” to detect vibration, light, sound or other signals. That means they constantly consume power, with much of that power and time spent processing what often turns out to be...

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