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Innovative Design to Slash Keyhole Surgery Injuries

December 22, 2014 | by Nottingham Trent University | Comments

Failed clinical insertions for keyhole surgery could be reduced after researchers developed a new needle which self-retracts to avoid potentially fatal injuries. Developed by Nottingham Trent University and Olberon Medical Innovations, an automatic...

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UDI Update from the FDA

December 22, 2014 9:17 am | by FDA | Comments

Having passed the first Unique Device Identification System compliance date of September 24, 2014 (for Class III devices and devices licensed under the Public Health Service Act), the FDA’s Center for Devices and Radiological Health (CDRH) would like...

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Amputee Makes History with APL's Modular Prosthetic Limb

December 18, 2014 8:43 pm | by Johns Hopkins University | Comments

A Colorado man made history at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory this summer when he became the first bilateral shoulder-level amputee to wear and simultaneously control two of the Laboratory’s Modular Prosthetic Limbs. Most importantly, Les Baugh, who lost both arms in an electrical accident 40 years ago, was able to operate the system...

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3Q: Hacking Ebola Health Care

December 18, 2014 8:32 pm | by MIT | Comments

Bryan Ranger, a third-year doctoral student in the Harvard-MIT Health Sciences and Technology program, was the student lead for MIT’s participation in the weekend event Stop Ebola Hackathon (Dec. 13-14). The event was sponsored by the Massachusetts General Hospital Center for Global Health, MIT Hacking Medicine, and other organizations. It drew more than 100 participants...

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New Technology Advances Eye Tracking as Biomarker for Brain Function and Brain Injury

December 17, 2014 10:39 pm | by NYU Langone Medical Center / New York University School of Medicine | Comments

Researchers at NYU Langone Medical Center have developed new technology that can assess the location and impact of a brain injury merely by tracking the eye movements of patients as they watch music videos for less than four minutes, according to a study...

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Lens-Free Microscope Can Detect Cancer at the Cellular Level

December 17, 2014 9:58 pm | by UCLA | Comments

UCLA researchers have developed a lens-free microscope that can be used to detect the presence of cancer or other cell-level abnormalities with the same accuracy as larger and more expensive optical microscopes. The invention could lead to less expensive and more portable technology...

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Key Method for Manipulating Cells in Engineered Tissues Developed

December 17, 2014 9:33 pm | by Carnegie Mellon | Comments

Carnegie Mellon University Professor Adam Feinberg and his colleagues have developed a new method to control how cells organize themselves on surfaces, a key process required for building and interfacing muscle tissue with medical devices such as coronary stents...

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Microwave Imaging of the Breast

December 17, 2014 9:23 pm | by American Institute of Physics (AIP) | Comments

Although currently available diagnostic screening systems for breast cancer like X-ray computed tomography (CT) and mammography are effective at detecting early signs of tumors, they are far from perfect, subjecting patients to ionizing radiation and sometimes...

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Robot Arm Prosthetic Controlled by the Brain

December 17, 2014 9:09 pm | by Anita Srikameswaran, University of Pittsburgh Schools of the Health Sciences | Comments

In another demonstration that brain-computer interface technology has the potential to improve the function and quality of life of those unable to use their own arms, a woman with quadriplegia shaped the almost human hand of a robot arm with just her thoughts to pick up big and small boxes, a ball, an oddly shaped rock, and fat and skinny tubes ...

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How Stroke Survivors Could Benefit from Video Games

December 17, 2014 10:52 am | by Lancaster University | Comments

Stroke survivors can have “significant” improvement in arm movements after using the Nintendo Wii as physiotherapy according to researchers. The popular computer remote could be customized to offer bespoke physiotherapy for stroke survivors in their own...

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Imaging Catheter for Treatment of Heart Disease Could Reduce Cardiac Intervention Complications

December 17, 2014 10:28 am | by RTI International | Comments

An emerging 3D imaging catheter aims to provide cardiologists with a live view from inside the heart during cardiac catheterizations. Developed by RTI International, the catheter contains an ultrasound microarray made using semiconductor circuit...

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New Technology Reprograms Skin Fibroblasts for a New Role

December 17, 2014 10:22 am | by Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania | Comments

As the main component of connective tissue in the body, fibroblasts are the most common type of cell. Taking advantage of that ready availability, scientists from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, the Wistar Institute...

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Infographic: Outsourcing in the Development of Medical Devices

December 17, 2014 10:11 am | by Eileen Whitmore, Art Director, and Sean Fenske, Editor-in-Chief | Comments

MDT sent out a survey to readers focused on their experience with outsourcing in the development of medical devices. The following infographic reflects their responses to a number of questions related to the topic. For additional insight...

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MedTech Engineer Specializes in Sophisticated Medicine

December 16, 2014 11:35 am | by Leda Zimmerman, MIT Spectrum | Comments

Bhatia’s research defies traditional academic categories, drawing simultaneously on biological and medical sciences, and multiple engineering disciplines. She has generated dozens of patents, several business spinouts, and earned a host of major scientific...

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Researcher 3D Prints LED onto Contact Lens

December 16, 2014 11:15 am | by John Sullivan, Office of Engineering Communications, Princeton | Comments

As part of a project demonstrating new 3D printing techniques, Princeton researchers have embedded tiny light-emitting diodes into a standard contact lens, allowing the device to project beams of colored light. Michael McAlpine, the lead researcher...

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Using Radio Waves or Magnetics to Control Cells and Genes

December 16, 2014 10:58 am | by Rockefeller University | Comments

It's the most basic of ways to find out what something does, whether it's an unmarked circuit breaker or an unidentified gene -- flip its switch and see what happens. New remote-control technology may offer biologists a powerful way to do this with cells...

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