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Tiny Bio-Robot Is a Germ Suited-Up with Graphene Quantum Dots

March 25, 2015 10:46 am | by University of Illinois at Chicago | Comments

As nanotechnology makes possible a world of machines too tiny to see, researchers are finding ways to combine living organisms with nonliving machinery to solve a variety of problems. Like other first-generation bio-robots, the new nanobot...

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Color-Changing Bracelet Detects Sunburn Early

March 25, 2015 10:40 am | by Queen's University Belfast | Comments

Sunbathers could soon tell when to take shelter in the shade thanks to an early warning sunburn indicator, developed by Queen’s University Belfast. Researchers at Queen’s have developed a strip of plastic, containing ‘smart’ ink, which turns...

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Device Protects Nerve Tissue During Bowel Surgery

March 25, 2015 10:32 am | by Fraunhofer-Gesellschaft | Comments

After bowel surgery, more than half of the patients suffer from irreparable nerve damage. Now scientists have developed an assistance system that warns surgeons about the risk of inflicting possible injury during operations in the pelvic area...

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Nanorobots Open the Blood-Brain Barrier for New Brain Treatments

March 25, 2015 10:27 am | by Université de Montréal | Comments

Magnetic nanoparticles can open the blood-brain barrier and deliver molecules directly to the brain, say researchers from the University of Montreal, Polytechnique Montréal, and CHU Sainte-Justine. This barrier runs inside almost all vessels...

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The Challenge of ‘Big Data’ in Healthcare

March 25, 2015 10:01 am | by AAMI | Comments

Aviation and other sectors have been harnessing the power of big data for years. As a result, these industries have witnessed improved safety, finding a way to turn such data into valuable knowledge that can guide decisions and strategies...

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Automated Braille Writing Tutor

March 25, 2015 9:56 am | by Byron Spice, Carnegie Mellon University | Comments

An innovative device developed by Carnegie Mellon University’s TechBridgeWorld research group to help visually impaired students learn how to write Braille using a slate and stylus is the winner of the 2014 Louis Braille Touch of Genius Prize...

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Hand-Held Probe First to Measure Bone Strength

March 25, 2015 9:51 am | by University of California - Santa Barbara | Comments

For people taking glucocorticoids such as prednisone, the increased risk of bone fracture is a well-documented side effect. Used to treat a variety of medical conditions, including autoimmune diseases and allergies, glucocorticoids are known to...

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'Simulant Gel' for Next-Generation Impact Injury Protection

March 25, 2015 9:34 am | by Denis Paiste, Materials Processing Center, MIT | Comments

Designing better protective gear against severe impacts for civilians and soldiers requires a detailed understanding of how soft tissues in the body actually respond to such impacts, whether from concussions, ballistic attacks, or blast wounds...

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Imaging Tests Detect Coronary Artery Disease Long Before It Strikes

March 25, 2015 9:27 am | by Mount Sinai Medical Center | Comments

Adding two non-invasive imaging tests to traditional cardiovascular disease risk factor assessment more precisely predicts a healthy patient’s future risk of heart attack, stroke, or premature death, according to a study led by Icahn School...

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Immunomagnetic Assay On-a-Chip Captures, Analyzes Circulating Tumor Cells

March 25, 2015 9:21 am | by Norris Cotton Cancer Center Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center | Comments

To quantify rare tumor markers that will allow oncologists to make prognoses and select therapies, John X.J. Zhang, PhD led a team of bioengineers from the Thayer School of Engineering at Dartmouth in demonstrating a novel system that...

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Blood Test Can Help Bowel Cancer Patients Avoid Drug Side-Effects

March 25, 2015 9:09 am | by University of Manchester | Comments

Manchester researchers have provided early evidence to suggest that a blood test could be used to identify bowel cancer patients that may benefit from more intensive chemotherapy. Colorectal, or bowel, cancer is the second biggest cancer...

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'Virtual Nose' May Reduce Simulator Sickness in Video Games

March 25, 2015 8:40 am | by Emil Venere, Purdue University | Comments

Virtual reality games often cause simulator sickness – inducing vertigo and sometimes nausea - but new research findings point to a potential strategy to ease the affliction. Various physiological systems govern the onset of simulator...

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Tampons Could Help Predict Endometrial Cancer

March 24, 2015 3:20 pm | by Mayo Clinic | Comments

Researchers at Mayo Clinic have shown that it is possible to detect endometrial cancer using tumor DNA picked up by ordinary tampons. The new approach specifically examines DNA samples from vaginal secretions for the presence of chemical "off"...

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Painting Tissue Samples with Light

March 24, 2015 3:15 pm | by University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign | Comments

One infrared scan can give pathologists a window into the structures and molecules inside tissues and cells, enabling fast and broad diagnostic assessments, thanks to an imaging technique developed by University of Illinois researchers and...

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Measuring the 'Duende' of Flamenco Dancers

March 24, 2015 3:11 pm | by University of Granada | Comments

Scientists from the University of Granada Brain, Mind and Behavior Research Center have identified the ‘thermal imprint’ of the duende of flamenco. Their experiments have isolated an objective criterion that shows which dancers really do experience...

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