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Automatic Film Splicer

May 19, 2015 10:19 am | by Butler Automatic | Product Releases | Comments

Butler Automatic, the inventor of automatic splicing solutions, announces its new SP3HSL Series Automatic Film Splicer. The SP3HSL Series Automatic Film Splicer, an automatic web splicing system for printed sleeve films, will increase line efficiency in sleeved...

Optical Tweezers Manipulate Key HIV Infection Protein

May 19, 2015 10:01 am | by Bill Hathaway, Yale University | News | Comments

Using an instrument so sensitive it can fold and unfold a single protein, Yale School of Medicine researchers have manipulated a protein essential for HIV to invade cells. The “optical tweezers” allowed researchers to apply tiny forces to a...

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Blood Biomarkers Aid in Alzheimer’s Battle

May 19, 2015 9:55 am | by Anke van Eekelen, Science Network WA | News | Comments

Researchers are developing an effective low-cost screening tool to facilitate Alzheimer’s disease (AD) diagnosis for the first time by analyzing different combinations of proteins in blood. ECU research fellow Dr. Veer Gupta presented her ongoing...

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Improving Access to Music for People Using Hearing Aids

May 19, 2015 9:48 am | by University of Leeds | News | Comments

Beethoven composed some of his most famous works after he became profoundly deaf. More recently, musicians such as Ozzy Osbourne, Brian Wilson and Phil Collins have encountered problems with their hearing. Tinnitus affects many more, from...

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Monitoring Blood Oxygen Levels in Prematurely Born Babies

May 19, 2015 9:44 am | by KTH The Royal Institute of Technology | News | Comments

A new monitoring tool for preemies could help reduce complications from dangerous blood-oxygen levels by 30 to 50 percent, say its Swedish developers. Prematurely born infants need to maintain precise blood oxygen levels in order to avoid permanent...

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Engineering Replacement Intestine Tissue

May 19, 2015 9:09 am | by Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center | News | Comments

New proof-of-concept research at Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine suggests the potential for engineering replacement intestine tissue in the lab, a treatment that could be applied to infants born with a short bowel and adults...

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A New Window into the Brain

May 19, 2015 9:00 am | by Universitaet Tübingen | News | Comments

Tübingen neuroscientists have made an important advance in studying the human brain with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). This imaging technique is used in research endeavors to investigate the interactions between different brain...

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Tiny Device Could Save Lives on Battlefield

May 19, 2015 8:57 am | by U.S. Army | News | Comments

Getting rapid treatment for wounds or injuries suffered on the battlefield can mean the difference between life and death. Army medical researchers recently developed "a device that will revolutionize triage," said Lt. Col. Robert Carter...

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Module Suppliers Should Be Viewed as Long-Term Partners

May 19, 2015 8:50 am | by Mike Rohrmoser, Senior Product Manager, Embedded Solutions, Digi International Inc. | Blogs | Comments

The ever-growing number of connected medical devices is driving significant benefits that are directly impacting many aspects of healthcare including clinical outcomes, patient safety, treatment cost, and record accuracy. Most of today's...

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Block Filters for Single-Phase Systems

May 18, 2015 4:45 pm | by Schurter, Inc. | Schurter, Inc. | Product Releases | Comments

SCHURTER is expanding its portfolio of block filters for single-phase systems, with its new FMAB NEO series. This single-phase filter is extremely compact, considering its highly effective symmetrical attenuation in the lower frequency range. The filter performance...

Reducing Immune System Rejection of Medical Implants

May 18, 2015 4:28 pm | by Anne Trafton, MIT News Office | News | Comments

Biomedical devices that can be implanted in the body for drug delivery, tissue engineering, or sensing can help improve treatment for many diseases. However, such devices are often susceptible to attack by the immune system, which can render...

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Microchip Captures Clusters of Circulating Tumor Cells

May 18, 2015 4:25 pm | by National Institutes of Health | News | Comments

Researchers have developed a microfluidic chip that can capture rare clusters of circulating tumor cells, which could yield important new insights into how cancer spreads. The work was funded by the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and...

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CO2 Laser Lenses

May 18, 2015 4:08 pm | by Laser Research Optics | Laser Research Optics | Product Releases | Comments

A line of OEM compatible, field-replacement CO2 laser lenses for popular lasers used for fabricating air vents, filters, signs and related applications is available from Laser Research Optics of Providence, Rhode Island. Laser Research Optics CO2 Lenses for thin...

Natural Forming Mandrels

May 18, 2015 4:03 pm | by Applied Plastics Co., Inc. | Applied Plastics Co., Inc. | Product Releases | Comments

A line of bendable, PFOA free Teflon coated nitinol forming mandrels for fuse welding and tipping operations that withstands high temperatures is available from Applied Plastics Co., Inc. of Norwood, Massachusetts. Applied Plastics Nitinol PTFE Natural Forming...

4 Consequences of Building the Bionic Human

May 18, 2015 4:02 pm | by Sam Brusco, Associate Editor, @SamISureAm | Blogs | Comments

If we’ve got the technology, and we’re willing to modify our bodies, should be making serious advances to ensure our longevity? This certainly makes sense for people who need it, but there’s quite a bit to consider before we all run off making ourselves into robots.

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