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New Red Blood Cell Simulator Invented At Queen Mary

June 27, 2013 3:58 pm | by Queen Mary, University of London | News | Comments

Engineers from Queen Mary, University of London have developed the most precise computer simulation of how red blood cells might travel around the body to help doctors treat people with serious circulatory problems. Understanding how damaged red blood cells might interact with each other or their neighboring cells could be useful in realizing blood flow in patients who are diabetic or have had surgery to address circulation complications.

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High-Resolution Mapping Technique Uncovers Underlying Circuit Architecture of the Brain

June 27, 2013 3:53 pm | by Gladstone Institutes | News | Comments

In the latest issue of Neuron, a team led by Gladstone Investigator Anatol Kreitzer, PhD, and Salk Investigator Edward Callaway, PhD, combined mouse models with a sophisticated tracing technique—known as the monosynaptic rabies virus system—to assemble brain-wide maps of neurons that connect with the basal ganglia, a region of the brain that is involved in movement and decision-making.

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Regenerate Our Own Insulin Cells?

June 27, 2013 3:48 pm | by Inserm | News | Comments

Researchers show that, in mice, the pancreas contains cells capable of being converted into insulin-producing β cells, something that can be done at any age. They also demonstrate that all pancreatic β cells can be regenerated several times and that chemically-induced diabetes in mice can thus be “treated” repeatedly.

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Insights into How Brain Compensates for Recurring Hearing Loss Point to New Glue Ear Therapies

June 27, 2013 3:39 pm | by Wellcome Trust | News | Comments

Important new insights into how the brain compensates for temporary hearing loss during infancy, such as that commonly experienced by children with glue ear, are revealed in a research study in ferrets. The Wellcome Trust-funded study at the University of Oxford could point to new therapies for glue ear and has implications for the design of hearing aid devices.

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How Small Medical Manufacturers Can Maximize Cash Flow

June 27, 2013 3:24 pm | by Michael Lewis, Writer, Money Crashers Personal Finance | Avicenna Technology, Inc. | Blogs | Comments

The single greatest objective of every business, no matter its size, industry, or history, is to achieve and maintain a positive cash flow, a condition where cash coming in equals or exceeds cash going out. According to Chad Carson, president of the Avicenna Division of Ametek Engineered Medical Components, the primary key to [business] success is cash flow, an opinion shared by most successful business professionals.

Multi-Touch Control Wheel Reads Gestures for Intuitive Equipment Control and Image Manipulation

June 27, 2013 3:14 pm | by MDT Staff | Grayhill, Inc. | Product Releases | Comments

Grayhill has announced the release of its latest model in a line of Multi-Touch Human Interface Devices as part of its Instinct Touch Technology control system. The new Series T2 Multi-Touch Control Wheel offers an expanded array of sensor data options.

Custom Machined Fittings Offer Tight Sealing

June 27, 2013 2:58 pm | by MDT Staff | Product Releases | Comments

Custom machined fittings, adapters, and flanges with intricate features and close tolerances for use with precision instruments, manifolds, and valves are being introduced by Specialized Turning. Specialized Custom Machined Fittings feature intricate details with close tolerances to 0.001” and surface finishes to 8 RMS, depending upon the material.

Polymer Outperforms Standard Copolymer Shapes

June 27, 2013 2:51 pm | by MDT Staff | Product Releases | Comments

Engineers consistently specify DuPont Delrin stock shapes extruded by Ensinger because of their increased physical properties which can be as much as 20% higher than other acetals. Manufactured from DuPont Delrin resin, Ensinger uses a proprietary extrusion process that produces shapes with lower stress and better dimensional stability.

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8 Contract Manufacturing Pitfalls to Avoid

June 27, 2013 2:05 pm | by Troy Hanes, Director of Manufacturing Engineering, Sparton | Sparton Medical | Articles | Comments

Selecting the best contract manufacturing partner can be a tricky process, especially for start-ups or companies new to the process. Since significant cost savings can be realized from working with a quality service provider, it is important for OEMs to identify key areas to make the process more efficient. This article outlines eight criteria to use during selection proceedings.

Hybrid Power Management System Delivers AC/DC Output Using any Battery Chemistry

June 27, 2013 12:57 pm | by MDT Staff | Product Releases | Comments

To make mobile medical carts more powerful and user-friendly, Hoffman Engineered Systems (HES) has introduced the 451 Hybrid Power Management System. This IEC 60601-1 3rd Edition-compliant, patent-pending power management system accepts any battery technology and converts the battery’s DC power into AC and DC outputs...

Lens-Free Imaging Technique Dramatically Extends Research Capabilities into Cells, Bacteria, and Viruses

June 27, 2013 12:48 pm | by Business Wire | News | Comments

CEA-Leti today introduced a new video lens-free imaging technique that redefines bio imaging, provides significant advantages over traditional microscopy, and opens a new range of capabilities for researchers, such as real-time monitoring of cell cultures.

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Device Designed to Avert Repeated Breast Cancer Surgeries

June 27, 2013 12:15 pm | by Johns Hopkins | Videos | Comments

When a breast tumor is detected, many women opt to have a lumpectomy, which is surgery designed to remove the diseased tissue while preserving the breast. But during this procedure, doctors cannot learn right away whether all of the cancerous tissue has been removed, with no microscopic signs that cancer cells were left behind.

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Johns Hopkins Students’ Device Aims to Avert Repeated Breast Cancer Surgeries

June 27, 2013 11:57 am | by Johns Hopkins | News | Comments

To reduce the need for second surgeries, four Johns Hopkins graduate students have designed a device to allow pathologists to quickly inspect excised breast tissue within 20 minutes, while the patient is still in the operating room. If this inspection indicates that the tumor was not fully removed, additional tissue can then be removed during the same operation.

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The Pulse: Artificial Pancreas Supplies Insulin to Patients

June 27, 2013 11:13 am | by Eric Sorensen, Coordinator of Multimedia Development | Videos | Comments

On this episode of The Pulse, a major step toward an artificial pancreas, detecting disease from just one drop blood, creating mature human cardiac patches from human heart cells, and a smart sock that helps runners improve their technique and prevent injuries.  

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Have a Brain Injury? You May Be at Higher Risk for Stroke

June 27, 2013 11:04 am | by American Academy of Neurology | News | Comments

People who have a traumatic brain injury (TBI) may be more likely to have a future stroke, according to research that appears in the June 26, 2013, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.  

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