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Compact Stainless Steel Multi-Application Pressure Switch

June 4, 2013 5:20 pm | by MDT Staff | Product Releases | Comments

A tough operating environment is no match for Ashcroft’s A Series pressure switch. All 316 stainless steel construction, a weatherproof IP67 enclosure and an operating temp from -40°F to 212°F make this compact switch the ideal choice for a wide variety of industrial and OEM installations.

High Performance Disc Magnet Motor

June 4, 2013 4:57 pm | by MDT Staff | Portescap | Product Releases | Comments

Portescap has introduced the P532 series disc magnet step motor with encoder. This integrated solution delivers a best-in-class power rate and acceleration to outperform standard Brushless DC motors in a wide range of applications where closed loop performance is needed.

OEM Liquid Pumps: High Pressure Transfer with Micro Footprint

June 4, 2013 4:38 pm | by MDT Staff | KNF Neuberger, Inc. | Product Releases | Comments

KNF Neuberger OEM self-priming micro-diaphragm liquid transfer pumps offer design engineers a unique combination of performance and application flexibility in a remarkably small package – as small as 1.5” in length. They are rated to operate continuously against pressures as high as 87 PSIG...

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Cabinets for Low Humidity Storage of Medical Devices

June 4, 2013 4:22 pm | by MDT Staff | Product Releases | Comments

Seika Machinery has announced that several of its McDry Ultra-Low Humidity Storage Cabinets are ideal for medical device applications. The McDry DXU models maintain one percent RH levels and the MCU models maintain three percent RH levels.

Blue Belt Technologies Announces US FDA Clearance to Market its STRIDE Unicondylar Knee System

June 4, 2013 4:21 pm | by Business Wire | News | Comments

Blue Belt Technologies, Inc., an innovative medical technology company commercializing robotic-assisted solutions for orthopedic surgery, today announced that it has received 510(k) clearance from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to market its STRIDE™ Unicondylar Knee implant system.

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The Symphony of Surgical Robotics

June 4, 2013 3:44 pm | by Phil Brown, VP & GM, Pro-Dex Inc. – OMS | Pro-Dex | Articles | Comments

Surgical robots are becoming more of a standard in operating rooms. As such, device designers are going to need to understand the motion control technology that makes them function. This article looks at the “sheet music” that offers the guidance to the “conductor” who is instructing the “instruments.”

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Will Connected Health Save the Healthcare Industry?

June 4, 2013 3:07 pm | by Ralph Hugeneck, Director of Medical Technology, and Gary Baker, Marketing Communications Manager, Jabil Healthcare & Life Sciences | Jabil | Blogs | Comments

The medical device ecosystem is changing dramatically from stand-alone “device + patient + physician” in the clinical environment to include access and mobility outside the four walls of the hospital. Every medical device manufacturer should consider developing a strategy around how mobile connected health will affect their business models and how they will play in the evolution of the market.

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Transparent Electrode Enables Electronics on Contact Lens

June 4, 2013 12:10 pm | by Eunhee Song, UNIST | News | Comments

A hybrid transparent and stretchable electrode could open the new way for flexible displays, solar cells, and even electronic devices fitted on a curvature substrate such as soft eye contact lenses, by the UNIST (Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology) research team.

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A Step Closer to Artificial Livers

June 4, 2013 11:54 am | by Anne Trafton, MIT News Office | News | Comments

Prometheus, the mythological figure who stole fire from the gods, was punished for this theft by being bound to a rock. Each day, an eagle swept down and fed on his liver, which then grew back to be eaten again the next day. Modern scientists know there is a grain of truth to the tale, says MIT engineer Sangeeta Bhatia: The liver can indeed regenerate itself if part of it is removed.

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Detecting Disease with a Smartphone Accessory

June 4, 2013 11:36 am | by The Optical Society | News | Comments

As drugs that treat HIV have become more common, the incidence of Kaposi's sarcoma has decreased in the U.S. The disease, however, remains prevalent in sub-Saharan Africa, where poor access to medical care and lab tests only compound the problem. Now, Cornell engineers have created a smartphone-based system, consisting of a plug-in optical accessory and disposable microfluidic chips, for detection of the herpes virus that causes Kaposi's.

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National Review: Non-Adherence Among Teenage Heart Transplant Recipients Is Widespread, Often Fatal

June 4, 2013 10:40 am | by Boston Children's Hospital | News | Comments

After receiving an organ transplant, patients must follow a regimented medication routine to maintain the health of their graft (transplanted organ). Failure to do so, known as non-adherence (NA), can result in life-threatening illness. NA has long been a concern among adolescent patients, but a new study from Boston Children's Hospital demonstrates the problem may be more serious than previously understood.

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Altered Neural Circuitry May Lead to Anorexia and Bulimia

June 4, 2013 10:10 am | by University of California - San Diego | News | Comments

A landmark study, with first author Tyson Oberndorfer, MD, and led by Walter H. Kaye, MD, professor of psychiatry at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine, suggests that the altered function of neural circuitry contributes to restricted eating in anorexia and overeating in bulimia.

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Technique Could Identify Patients at High Risk of Stroke or Brain Hemorrhage

June 4, 2013 10:07 am | by Nationwide Children’s Hospital | News | Comments

Measuring blood flow in the brain may be an easy, noninvasive way to predict stroke or hemorrhage in children receiving cardiac or respiratory support through a machine called ECMO, according to a new study by researchers at Nationwide Children’s Hospital. Early detection would allow physicians to alter treatment and take steps to prevent these complications—the leading cause of death for patients on ECMO.

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Alzheimer's Leaves Clues in Blood

June 4, 2013 10:04 am | by Kaizo | News | Comments

Alzheimer researchers in Spain have taken a step closer to finding a blood test to help in the diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease. With approximately 75% of the estimated 36 million Alzheimer's sufferers worldwide yet to receive a reliable diagnosis, the potential impact on the lives of possible sufferers, present and future, could be huge.

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Stanford Scientists Create Novel Silicon Electrodes that Improve Lithium-Ion Batteries

June 4, 2013 10:00 am | by Stanford University | News | Comments

Stanford University scientists have dramatically improved the performance of lithium-ion batteries by creating novel electrodes made of silicon and conducting polymer hydrogel, a spongy material similar to that used in contact lenses and other household products.

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