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Will Reading The Doc's Notes Improve Your Health?

July 30, 2010 5:38 pm Podcasts Comments

The Open Notes project connects some 25,000 patients with their doctors' medical notes through secure online portals. Participating doctors Tom Delbanco and Sara Fazio of Boston's Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center discuss the program, and why it has some doctors worried.

Why Do We Like What We Like?

July 26, 2010 9:36 am Podcasts Comments

Why do we enjoy things like bitter foods and horror films? And are we the only species that likes art? Paul Bloom, professor of psychology at Yale University and author of How Pleasure Works, explains our penchant for art and why we find some unpleasant things so enjoyable.

Remembering The Race To The South Pole

July 26, 2010 9:36 am Podcasts Comments

In 1911, two groups of explorers set out to be first to reach the South Pole. One claimed victory, and the other perished on the return trip. Ross MacPhee of the American Museum of Natural History and polar explorer John Huston discuss these scientific pioneers.

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Robots That Swim With The Fishes, Intentionally

July 26, 2010 9:36 am Podcasts Comments

Based on mathematical models of the movement of fish, Maurizio Porfiri, engineering professor at Polytechnic Institute of NYU, built a robofish. When Porfiri let the robot go for a dip in the lab pool, the real fish started to mill about the robot and even follow it around.

Scientists Say A Gel Can Slow HIV Spread

July 26, 2010 9:36 am Podcasts Comments

Researchers meeting at the 18th international AIDS conference this week say a new vaginal gel can cut HIV transmission rates in half, if used properly. AIDS experts Anthony Fauci and Kevin Fenton join Ira Flatow to discuss the gel study, and other news from the conference.

Exploring The Geology Of Gulf Oil

July 26, 2010 9:36 am Podcasts Comments

How much oil is under the Gulf of Mexico and how did it get there? Columbia University geophysicist Roger Anderson, an expert in deepwater exploration and drilling, explains how the oil formed millions of years ago, and how companies go about finding and extracting it.

Goodbye, Dr. Schneider

July 26, 2010 9:36 am Podcasts Comments

Influential and outspoken climatologist Stephen Schneider died this week of an apparent heart attack. Schneider's friend and colleague Dan Kammen describes Schneider's contributions to climate change research, and recalls the man he knew as "a wonderful, fearless soul."

Eastman's Scott Hanson Discusses Unique Material Solutions and Partnerships

July 20, 2010 2:31 pm | by MDTeditor Videos Comments

Scott Hanson, Global Industry Leader, Medical Segment at Eastman Chemical Co., offers insight on the success of a collaborative approach Eastman took with other company partners in resolving the specific requirements of DD Studio's customer. Visit http://www.eastman.com to find out more...

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Who Is Tracking Spilled Oil In The Gulf?

July 20, 2010 7:35 am Podcasts Comments

A team of ocean scientists has a plan to track the oil from the Deepwater Horizon spill, but so far they have no funding. Team leader Ira Leifer explains the proposed study. He says basic questions about the oil spill, such as where the oil is going, are not being answered.

Where Are The 'Hackers' Now?

July 20, 2010 7:35 am Podcasts Comments

In his 1984 book, Hackers: Heroes of the Computer Revolution, author Steven Levy profiled some of the personalities whose work brought PCs to the people, including Bill Gates and Steve Jobs. Levy discusses his book, recently reissued, and hacker ethics in the Internet age.

Smart Fibers Could Bring Smarter Clothes

July 20, 2010 7:35 am Podcasts Comments

We have smart cars and smart phones, why not smart clothes? They might be coming soon. Materials scientist Yoel Fink describes his work developing fibers that take photos, listen and transmit sound. He says a shirt may one day monitor your health by tracking body sounds.

Beach Season For Horseshoe Crabs

July 20, 2010 7:35 am Podcasts Comments

Each summer, horseshoe crabs (Limulus polyphemus) along the Atlantic shore crawl onto beaches to mate and lay eggs -- making now a good time for marine scientists like John Tanacredi to monitor population size. Science Friday visits a New York beach to catch a glimpse of the action.

Are Protons Even Smaller Than We Thought?

July 20, 2010 7:35 am Podcasts Comments

An international team of physicists reexamined the radius of a proton, and found it to be 4 percent smaller than previously thought. Are they mistaken, or is something missing from the long-held theory of quantum electrodynamics? Physicist Brian Odom of Northwestern University discusses.

Harold Varmus Returns To Politics

July 20, 2010 7:34 am Podcasts Comments

The Nobel Prize winner and former NIH director has received another presidential appointment: director of the National Cancer Institute. Ira Flatow and Varmus discuss the intersection of politics and science, the genetics of cancer and the process by which basic research becomes medicine.

Climate Scientists Move Forward After Scandal

July 20, 2010 7:34 am Podcasts Comments

Last December, e-mails written by climate scientists raised suspicion of scientific misconduct and conspiracy. International investigations have since exonerated the scientists of accusations of manipulating data. New York Times contributor Andrew Revkin explains what happened.

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