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The Pulse: How to Patent Bone

July 25, 2013 10:58 am | by Eric Sorensen, Coordinator of Multimedia Development Videos Comments

Welcome to the Pulse, brought to you by MDT TV. Today, we’re patenting new biomaterial to make artificial bones, creating pain-free prosthetics, using ultrasound waves to improve your mood, and using magnets to steer stem cells.                 

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IBIS Could Make Keyhole Robotic Surgery Cheaper

July 25, 2013 10:44 am | by Diginfonews Videos Comments

The IBIS system, developed at the Tokyo Institute of Technology, uses many off-the shelf devices to perform the same or similar tasks that the more well-known da Vinci surgical robot can perform. Essentially, providing a quality keyhole surgery technology for potentially one tenth the cost, according to the researchers.

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A Promising Test for Pancreatic Cancer ... From a Teenager

July 25, 2013 10:12 am Videos Comments

Over 85 percent of all pancreatic cancers are diagnosed late, when someone has less than two percent chance of survival. How could this be? Jack Andraka talks about how he developed a promising early detection test for pancreatic cancer that’s super cheap, effective and non-invasive -- all before his 16th birthday.

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Tiny Lab Under the Skin

July 24, 2013 5:32 pm | by Reuters Videos Comments

Amid yet more claims of illegal drug-taking by high-profile athletes, scientists in Switzerland say they may have found a foolproof way to prevent the use of banned substances in sports. They say their chip implant, designed to monitor naturally-occurring substances in the blood, could also be used as a weapon against drug cheats.

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Medical Device Designer Wins 2013 $30,000 Lemelson-MIT Student Prize

July 23, 2013 11:39 am | by MIT TechTV Videos Comments

Nikolai Begg grew up in a box of LEGO bricks and hasn’t stopped tinkering since. He is an accomplished inventor with a portfolio of novel medical devices, and today, Begg was named the recipient of the prestigious $30,000 Lemelson-MIT Student Prize for his inventions that are making surgical procedures less invasive.

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The Pulse: Achieving Sight Through Sound

July 11, 2013 11:09 am | by Eric Sorensen, Coordinator of Multimedia Development Videos Comments

On this episode of The Pulse, a device that helps train the brain to turn sounds into images, detecting cancer by imaging the consumption of sugar, biomedical applications for a new hydrogel, and a nanofiber mesh that treats tumors with both thermotherapy and chemotherapy.

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Device Designed to Avert Repeated Breast Cancer Surgeries

June 27, 2013 12:15 pm | by Johns Hopkins Videos Comments

When a breast tumor is detected, many women opt to have a lumpectomy, which is surgery designed to remove the diseased tissue while preserving the breast. But during this procedure, doctors cannot learn right away whether all of the cancerous tissue has been removed, with no microscopic signs that cancer cells were left behind.

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The Pulse: Artificial Pancreas Supplies Insulin to Patients

June 27, 2013 11:13 am | by Eric Sorensen, Coordinator of Multimedia Development Videos Comments

On this episode of The Pulse, a major step toward an artificial pancreas, detecting disease from just one drop blood, creating mature human cardiac patches from human heart cells, and a smart sock that helps runners improve their technique and prevent injuries.  

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Effects of DBS on Motor Symptoms of Parkinson's Disease

June 25, 2013 11:49 am | by Andrew Johnson Videos Comments

In November 2012 and February 2013, Andrew Johnson underwent a surgical procedure, Deep Brain Stimulation surgery, to help control his motor symptoms. This video represents his experience of how DBS has helped him. He is using a device from Medtronic.

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Nerve Interface for Direct Sensory Feedback

June 20, 2013 12:20 pm | by DARPA Videos Comments

Researchers used a flat interface nerve electrode to demonstrate direct sensory feedback. By interfacing with residual nerves in the patient's partial limb, some sense of touch by the fingers is restored. Unlike visual feedback, direct sensory feedback allows patients to move a hand without keeping their eyes on it—enabling simple tasks, like rummaging through a bag for small items, not possible with today's prosthetics.

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Researchers Come to Grips with Seahorse Armor

June 20, 2013 9:21 am | by Reuters Videos Comments

Researchers are developing a new type of gripping arm for medical and engineering applications, using the the flexible armor of seahorses as a model. A team at the University of California San Diego says the creature's natural armor plating provides a degree of strength and flexibility that does not exist outside nature. Tara Cleary reports.

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The Pulse: New Interface Rewires Nerves from Amputated Limbs

June 13, 2013 9:43 am | by Eric Sorensen, Coordinator of Multimedia Development Videos Comments

On this episode of The Pulse, rewired nerves from amputated limbs allow for prosthetic control with existing muscles, a bioengineered blood vessel is transplanted, diabetes is diagnosed through breath analysis alone, and a new technology is paving the way for low-cost electronic devices that work in direct contact with living tissue inside the body.

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Exhaled Breath Sensor for Diagnosis of Diabetes Using Platinum-Loaded SnO2 Nanofibers

June 12, 2013 10:48 am | by The Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology Videos Comments

Professor Il-Doo Kim of Materials Science & Engineering, KAIST, developed an exhaled breath sensor that is composed of highly porous tin dioxide (SnO2) nanofibers with a unique nanostructure functionalized by catalytic platinum (Pt) particles. This unique structure reacts to acetone gas, which is known as a biomarker of diabetes, for the fast diagnosis of the disease within 10 seconds.

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Nerve Interface for Direct Sensory Feedback

June 12, 2013 10:33 am | by DARPA Videos Comments

Researchers at Case Western Reserve University used a flat interface nerve electrode (FINE) to demonstrate direct sensory feedback. By interfacing with residual nerves in the patient's partial limb, some sense of touch by the fingers is restored. Other existing prosthetic limb control systems rely solely on visual feedback.

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Targeted Muscle Re-innveration for Advanced Prosthetic Control

June 12, 2013 10:26 am | by DARPA Videos Comments

A team of researchers at the Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago (RIC) demonstrated a type of peripheral interface called targeted muscle re-innervation (TMR). By rewiring nerves from amputated limbs, new interfaces allow for prosthetic control with existing muscles. Former Army Staff Sgt. Glen Lehman, injured in Iraq, recently demonstrated improved TMR technology.

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