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European Research Project Aims to Improve the Diagnosis and Therapy of Brain Diseases

Fri, 07/30/2010 - 8:33am
Bio-Medicine.Org

CATANIA, Italy, July 30 /PRNewswire-FirstCall/ -- The partners in a new publicly-funded European research project today announced details of the multinational/multidisciplinary program: 'CSI: Central Nervous System Imaging.' This three-year ENIAC (European Nanoelectronics Initiative Advisory Council) project aims to achieve substantial advances in state-of-the-art medical 3D-imaging platforms by focusing on the diagnosis and therapy of serious diseases of the central nervous system and brain. Key medical-imaging technologies will be significantly enhanced by means of major improvement in sensors, equipment and computing platforms to boost early diagnostics and prevention capability while reducing total equipments cost.

One of the most important challenges facing Europe is the trend towards an aging population. With many of the elderly people suffering from diseases of the central nervous system, the number of patients is also growing. These serious illnesses require some of the most expensive diagnosis/therapy procedures. In addition, these diseases, which include degenerative brain diseases such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases, Epilepsy, and circulatory problems such as strokes, are among those with the fastest growing impact on society.

Minimally-invasive ICT-based imaging technologies such as PET (Positron Emission Tomography), MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) and EEG (Electro EncephaloGraphy) play a vital role in detecting and tracking the evolution of these illnesses and determining the strategy and the effectiveness of the prescribed therapies. Part of the ENIAC 'Nanoelectronics for Health and Wellness' sub-program, the CSI project will pursue the simultaneous capturing/extraction of data produced by next-generation imaging devices in order to provide the best correlated inform

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