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Society of Interventional Radiology Supports Research for New M.S. Treatments

Thu, 08/26/2010 - 8:33am
Bio-Medicine.Org

FAIRFAX, Va., Aug. 26 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Recognizing that venous interventions may potentially play an important role in treating some patients who suffer from multiple sclerosis -- an incurable, disabling disease -- the Society of Interventional Radiology has issued a position statement indicating its support for high-quality clinical research to determine the safety and effectiveness of interventional M.S. treatments. SIR's position statement is endorsed by the Canadian Interventional Radiology Association and will be published in the September Journal of Vascular and Interventional Radiology.

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"The Society of Interventional Radiology would like to be actively involved in developing evidence-based therapies for the potential treatment of patients with multiple sclerosis," said SIR President James F. Benenati, M.D., FSIR. "Completing high-quality studies -- for example, on chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency (CCSVI, a reported abnormality in blood drainage from the brain and spinal cord) and interventional M.S. treatments -- should be a research priority for investigators, funding agencies and M.S. community advocates," added Benenati, who represents nearly 4,700 doctors, scientists and allied health professionals dedicated to improving health care through minimally invasive treatments.

About 500,000 people in the United States have M.S., and SIR understands the public's desire to advance treatment for M.S., generally thought of as an autoimmune disease in which a person's body attacks its own cells. Currently, medicines may slow the disease and help control symptoms. The role of CCSVI in M.S. and its endovascular treatment (through a catheter placed in a vein

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