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DaTSCAN™ (Ioflupane I 123 Injection) Recommended in Updated European Guidelines for Diagnosis of Alzheimer's Disease

Thu, 10/14/2010 - 4:31am
Bio-Medicine.Org

PRINCETON, N.J., Oct. 14 /PRNewswire/ -- GE Healthcare, a unit of General Electric Company (NYSE: GE), today announced that DaTSCAN™ (ioflupane I 123 injection), a radiopharmaceutical agent intended for use with single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging of the brain, has been recommended in updated European Federation of the Neurological Societies (EFNS) guidelines for the diagnosis and management of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The guidelines appear in the October issue of the European Journal of Neurology.(1)

Specifically, the guidelines, which were last issued in 2007(2), note that SPECT "may increase diagnostic confidence in the evaluation of dementia," adding that dopaminergic SPECT imaging with DaTSCAN is useful in differentiating AD from dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB)(1), a neurological condition that is similar to AD in that it results from the death of nerve cells in the brain.(3) The EFNS recommendation carries a level A grade of evidence – the strongest grade assigned in the guidelines – noting that DaTSCAN can differentiate AD from DLB with sensitivity and specificity of "around 85%."(1,2)

"As the global population ages and the prevalence of dementia rises, it will become increasingly important to be able to differentiate Alzheimer's disease from other types of dementia," said Adrian Holden, EU Head of Medical Professional Services for GE Healthcare. "Neurologists will therefore become increasingly reliant on imaging technologies that can accurately yield a definitive diagnosis. We are pleased that the EFNS has recognized the value of DaTSCAN in facilitating diagnosis of dementia, particularly with regard to distinguishing Alzheimer's disease from dementia with Lewy bodies. We hope the EFNS recommendation results in enhanced provision of timely and appropriate treatment to patients living with dementia – not only

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