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New Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT) Protocols Fuel Interest in Advanced Lung and Liver Treatments

Mon, 11/15/2010 - 5:34am
Bio-Medicine.Org

WESTCHESTER, Ill., Nov. 15, 2010 /PRNewswire/ -- While many clinicians around the world have adopted radiosurgery for the treatment of cancer, advances in technology along with newly-established treatment protocols introduced at this summer's 5th International Conference of the Novalis Circle, have fueled increased interest in broadening the application of radiosurgery.  

"Radiosurgery is certainly not new to the medical community, but equipment enhancements and increased collaboration among clinicians is driving us to utilize it in new and exciting ways," said Deborah Benzil, M.D., chairperson of the Novalis Circle Conference this year and neurosurgeon with the Mount Kisco Medical Group in Mount Kisco, N.Y. "More than 200 clinicians representing 80 counties convened for this year's Novalis Circle event. This level of participation speaks to the greater medical community's desire to gain access to and utilize leading radiosurgery treatment protocols, while also collaborating with peers on new techniques and applications."

Of particular interest to attendees at this year's Novalis Circle event, sponsored by Brainlab, a leading provider of radiosurgery technology, were new stereotactic body radiation therapy treatment (SBRT) protocols for the lung and liver.

One such protocol, introduced by Bin Teh, M.D., vice chair of the Department of Radiation Oncology at The Methodist Hospital in Houston, Texas, is providing encouraging results in using fractionated body radiation therapy (F-SBRT) to control primary, recurrent and metastatic lung cancer. Producing control rates greater than 90 percent, Dr. Teh explained that the lung protocol can help clinicians effectively treat patients that may be too compromised for invasive surgery.

"For the first time in 50 years, we have a new treatment option – F-SBRT – that can positively impact patients living with primary or metastatic lung cancers," said Dr. Teh. "When shared am

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