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NIH-Funded Study Is First to Demonstrate Increased Long-Term Survival With Favorable Neurologic Function Among Patients Receiving CPR Using ACSI ResQPump™ and ResQPOD® CPR De...

Mon, 11/15/2010 - 7:34am
Bio-Medicine.Org

CHICAGO, Nov. 15, 2010 /PRNewswire/ -- A combination of two devices could save the lives of several thousand cardiac arrest patients each year if implemented nationwide, suggests results of a clinical trial presented at today's American Heart Association Resuscitation Science Symposium. A significantly higher percentage of patients who experienced out-of-hospital cardiac arrest survived after receiving active compression decompression cardiopulmonary resuscitation (ACD CPR) performed with the ResQPump™ and the ResQPOD® impedance threshold device as compared to those receiving conventional, manual CPR performed with a pair of hands. Both devices are manufactured by Advanced Circulatory Systems, Inc. (ACSI) in Roseville, Minn.

Ralph J. Frascone, MD, associate professor of emergency medicine at the University of Minnesota and EMS medical director at Regions Hospital in St. Paul (Minn), presented the results of the study.

"Each year, approximately 300,000 Americans experience out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, and the national average for survival to hospital discharge is dismal – only about 5 percent," Frascone said. "However, in this study, patients who received CPR by rescuers using the device combination had a 53 percent higher survival to hospital discharge rate with favorable neurologic function than those who did not, and, a significant survival benefit was still present one year after the initial cardiac arrest event."

"The goal of resuscitation during cardiac arrest is long-term survival with preservation of brain function," commented Dr. Tom P. Aufderheide, principal investigator at one of the study sites. "This new, effective intervention achieves that goal and is potentially the most significant advancement in the treatment of cardiac arrest since defibrillation."

Funded by the National Institutes of Health and sponsored by Advanced Circulatory Systems, Inc., the trial compared survival rates among a control grou

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