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SAFE IN COMMON Launches Global Injection Safety Website

Fri, 11/05/2010 - 7:39am
Bio-Medicine.Org

LEWISBERRY, Pa., Nov. 5, 2010 /PRNewswire/ -- SAFE IN COMMON, an online community of  healthcare workers, educators, patients, community leaders and individuals, today announced the launch of its website dedicated to raising awareness of global injection safety challenges.

SAFE IN COMMON's launch coincides with the 10th anniversary of the passage of the Needlestick Safety and Prevention Act, which mandates the use of safety engineered medical devices, (SEMDs), within U.S. healthcare facilities to protect healthcare workers and patients from the risk of needlestick injuries. Despite this legislation and its enforcement by OSHA, healthcare workers continue to remain at risk of harm.  For example, reports in the U.S. indicate that currently available safety syringes are not providing adequate levels of protection.  In fact, reported needlestick injuries in Massachusetts have not fallen since 2002, and safety products are responsible for the majority of those injuries.

While steps have been taken in the U.S. and Europe to mandate the use of SEMDs, the harm caused by unsafe injection practices represents a global humanitarian challenge. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), there are more than 1.3 million needlestick related deaths worldwide each year.

"As a former nurse, I have first hand experience with the physical and emotional dangers of a needlestick injury. However, the problems and risks associated with needlestick injuries are real and affect the lives of millions of people around the world, not just those in the healthcare field," commented Dr. Mary Foley, Associate Director, Center for Nursing Research and Innovation. "Much has been accomplished since the signing of the Needlestick Safety and Prevention Act of 2000, but the safety laws and policies currently in place are poorly enforced and need to be addressed.  SAFE IN COMMON is in a unique to position to advocate for this change. Not only will SAFE IN

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