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Critical Care Nurses Do Not Have Access to Tools They Need to Treat Sepsis

Tue, 12/21/2010 - 7:33am
Bio-Medicine.Org

DURHAM, N.C., Dec. 21, 2010 /PRNewswire/ -- bioMerieux, a world leader in the field of in vitro diagnostics, announced the results of a survey demonstrating that most critical care nurses are unaware of a simple diagnostic test that may dramatically improve outcomes for sepsis patients. The survey, conducted at the 2010 American Association of Critical Care Nurses' annual meeting, revealed that while the vast majority of nurses expressed the need for new tools to battle sepsis, 25 percent of the 220 nurses surveyed reported that their hospitals do not have a rapid response protocol for the early identification of potential sepsis patients. For more information, visit www.SepsisKnowFromDay1.com.

"There are best-in-class processes in healthcare with irrefutable benefits to patients," said Kirsten Springer, RN, CCRN, sepsis coordinator in the Surgical Neuro Trauma ICU at Mission Hospital in Mission Viejo, California. "Testing suspected sepsis patients for procalcitonin (PCT) levels is one of those best practices that could dramatically improve outcomes once adopted nationwide."

Springer was part of a team that developed an early response sepsis protocol at Mission Hospital, which has had a dramatic impact on sepsis mortality and length of stay for recovering sepsis patients. A cornerstone of that protocol is a 20-minute test produced by bioMerieux to detect PCT, a natural human protein that spikes during severe bacterial infections, which often lead to sepsis.

Ninety-five percent of nurses surveyed (209) said they assist in the management of sepsis patients and that none of their hospitals currently use PCT testing to rapidly assess suspected sepsis patients.  All of these nurses indicated this test could be incredibly beneficial if it were available at their hospitals. Also of note, 83 percent of those surveyed said that their ICUs and EDs did not have tools to rapidly diagnose severe

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