Advertisement
News
Advertisement

New CVS Caremark Study Finds Health Information Technology May Help Promote Adherence, But More Information and Direction Needed

Thu, 12/23/2010 - 7:31am
Bio-Medicine.Org

WOONSOCKET, R.I., Dec. 23, 2010 /PRNewswire/ -- A new study that reviews more than four decades of medical journal articles about the impact of health information technology (HIT) and electronic communications on medication adherence concludes that while there is evidence to suggest that simple electronic reminders are an effective and low-cost means to improve adherence, there are few studies that show how HIT can be leveraged to more thoughtfully engage or motivate patients to take medications as prescribed.

(Logo: http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20090226/NE75914LOGO)

The study was published this week in the American Journal of Managed Care and is the result of a research partnership between Harvard University, Brigham and Women's Hospital and CVS Caremark – a three-year collaboration focused on developing a better understanding of patient behavior, particularly around medication adherence.

According to the researchers, the study findings "highlight the disappointing state of evidence on a topic of substantial health importance." The researchers concluded that as the U.S. "invests substantially in the broad implementation of HIT, innovative adherence interventions built on the capabilities of HIT are essential and must be rigorously tested to identify applicable best practices."

Researchers reviewed more than 7,000 articles published between 1966 and 2010 that discussed the use of HIT for treating cardiovascular disease and diabetes. After screening out articles that did not address how electronic communications can promote adherence, only 13 articles warranted full review.

"Despite the paucity of data, this review suggests that HIT interventions are promising tools in the fight to improve medication adherence," said William H. Shrank, MD, MSHS, of Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard, and the senior author of the studies. "While there have been many studies on the subject of boosting adherence, we

'/>"/>

SOURCE

Topics

Advertisement

Share this Story

X
You may login with either your assigned username or your e-mail address.
The password field is case sensitive.
Loading