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Instead of Preventing Infections, Silver Coated Needleless IV Connectors May Actually Cause Them, a Nationally-Recognized Expert Tells National Conference on Cancer Nursing Re...

Fri, 02/11/2011 - 6:34am
Bio-Medicine.Org

LOS ANGELES, Feb. 11, 2011 /PRNewswire/ -- Nationally-acclaimed researcher and award-winning author Dr. Cynthia C. Chernecky warned in a speech at the 11th National Conference on Cancer Nursing Research that silver treated IV connectors could actually cause potentially deadly infections they were supposed to prevent.

After testing antimicrobial effectiveness of three different needleless IV connector devices with silver coated or silver impregnated fluid pathway components, Dr. Chernecky, PhD, RN, AOCN, FAAN, said that despite FDA clearance of silver coatings, she found they actually grew bugs capable of causing potentially fatal infections.

Presenting to the Oncology Nursing Society and American Cancer Society, the nation's highest-level conference on oncology nursing, Dr. Chernecky's podium address was a wake-up call to leaders in the nursing profession in attendance.  A professor of Physiological and Technological Nursing at Georgia Health Sciences University, Dr. Chernecky was invited to deliver her remarks in one of the conference's prestigious podium presentations.  She is author of 30 books on nursing, including one on "Advance and Critical Care Nursing" that won the distinguished American Journal of Nursing "Book of the Year" Award.

Asked in an interview following her talk how silver-coatings received FDA clearance, Dr. Chernecky said the FDA was presented with evidence from the manufacturers that their silver treated needleless IV connectors were effective in killing bugs.  But when blood comes in contact with the silver coated or impregnated fluid pathway components in practical use, the silver loses its bug-killing capability and an intraluminal or biofilm condition is created that actually nourishes bacteria.  

"The FDA should consider requiring a blood component test protocol when evaluating needleless IV connector products, just as if you were testing a coffee maker you'd want coffee in it to see ho

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