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Critical Need Exists to Address Health Conditions That Put Patients at Highest Risk for Deep-Vein Thrombosis and Pulmonary Embolism

Wed, 03/09/2011 - 6:34am
Bio-Medicine.Org

NEW YORK, March 9, 2011 /PRNewswire/ -- As part of the eighth annual DVT (deep-vein thrombosis) Awareness Month, the Coalition to Prevent DVT is focusing on the importance of DVT and its risk factors among patients with co-morbid conditions – including but not limited to cancer, heart or respiratory and obesity patients.  

DVT remains the leading cause of hospital-related death, and 10 percent of hospital deaths may be due to PE (pulmonary embolism).(1)  This is due to restricted mobility, which can also be related to patients who have undergone surgery; such as cancer patients.  In addition, cardiovascular disease is one of the leading causes of death in the United States and those patients who experience poor circulation due to blockage in the arteries have heightened risk of blood clots and pooling.(2)  Based on these startling statistics, there is a critical need for healthcare professionals and individuals to recognize the risk and need for education about DVT and PE complications as a potentially leading cause of death.  

"For patients who are newly diagnosed with conditions such as cancer and obesity, it is extremely important that they are having conversations with their healthcare professionals about DVT and PE because these conditions are such serious risk factors for DVT," said Coalition National Patient Spokesperson, Melanie Bloom, whose husband, NBC news correspondent David Bloom, died eight years ago from DVT-related complications while covering the war in Iraq.  

Almost anyone who's fighting cancer is at heightened risk for developing a DVT; in fact a majority of patients with cancer may be at risk for DVT and complications from DVT are the second leading cause of death among cancer patients.(3)  More than 50 percent of people who died from certain cancers had developed a DVT(4) and certain types of cancer treatments may reduce the body's ability to produce blood clotting agents called a

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