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Physical Health Scores Predict Breast Cancer Outcomes

Wed, 04/06/2011 - 5:32am
AACR
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Risk of recurrence increased in women with poor health scores.

Five percent improvement in physical health score can reduce risk.

ORLANDO, Fla. - Breast cancer survivors with poor physical health scores had an elevated risk of poorer cancer outcomes, including recurrence and death, according to the results of an observational study presented at the AACR 102nd Annual Meeting 2011, held April 2-6.

Survivors of breast cancer who had poor health scores were 27 percent more likely to experience either a recurrence of their cancer or a new breast cancer. Physical health also impacted survival quite strongly; risk of death from any cause was 65 percent greater among those with poorer health scores.

Researchers from UC San Diego Moores Cancer Center used data from three of the four cohorts included in the After Breast Cancer (ABC) Pooling Project to analyze the association of poor physical health and survival, along with a cluster of comorbidities. The physical health score has been shown in smaller studies to be an important predictor of future breast cancer events and overall survival in women with breast cancer.

"Here we see a single metric that predicts risk," said John P. Pierce, Ph.D., who is the Sam M. Walton professor for cancer prevention and associate director for population sciences at Moores Cancer Center. "Variables cluster together and are summarized in the physical health score. The question becomes how to improve the physical health status of this particular group of breast cancer survivors."

Physical health scores were measured for a total of 9,387 early-stage breast cancer survivors, using the SF-36 – a multipurpose, short-form health survey taken after diagnosis, with follow-up occurring on average seven years later. The physical health score includes information about how an individual perceives their own physical functioning, bodily pain and limitations caused by physical problems.

About half the women in the sample had a physical health score that met the survey definition of poor physical health. Low physical health scores were strongly associated with a higher body mass index. The women with low scores were less physically active and were 64 percent more likely to have sleep difficulties. They also had 50 percent higher rates of high blood pressure and diabetes and were twice as likely to have arthritis.

By addressing this cluster of health concerns, clinicians can help women improve their health, feel better about their lives and reduce associated breast cancer risks, according to Pierce.

"Instead of looking at breast cancer survivors as a whole, we need to focus on the women with low physical health scores, those most at risk," he said. "An increase of 5 percent in their physical health score can reduce their risk. We can empower them to take charge of their health and thereby improve their chance of survival as well as their quality of life."

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The mission of the American Association for Cancer Research is to prevent and cure cancer. Founded in 1907, the AACR is the worlds oldest and largest professional organization dedicated to advancing cancer research. The membership includes 33,000 basic, translational and clinical researchers; health care professionals; and cancer survivors and advocates in the United States and more than 90 other countries. The AACR marshals the full spectrum of expertise from the cancer community to accelerate progress in the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of cancer through high-quality scientific and educational programs. It funds innovative, meritorious research grants, research fellowships and career development awards. The AACR Annual Meeting attracts more than 18,000 participants who share the latest discoveries and developments in the field. Special conferences throughout the year present novel data across a wide variety of topics in cancer research, treatment and patient care. Including Cancer Discovery, the AACR publishes seven major peer-reviewed journals: Cancer Research; Clinical Cancer Research; Molecular Cancer Therapeutics; Molecular Cancer Research; Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention; and Cancer Prevention Research. AACR journals represented 20 percent of the market share of total citations in 2009. The AACR also publishes CR, a magazine for cancer survivors and their families, patient advocates, physicians and scientists.

Media Contact:

Jeremy Moore

(267) 646-0557

Jeremy.Moore@aacr.org

In Orlando, April 2-6:

(407) 685-4001

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