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$10 Million Verdict Against Johnson & Johnson Unit for Toxic Motrin Reaction, Announces The Jensen Law Firm

Tue, 05/24/2011 - 7:34am
Bio-Medicine.Org

PHILADELPHIA, May 24, 2011 /PRNewswire/ -- Members of Fort Worth, Texas-based Jensen Law Firm ( www.stevensjohnsonsyndrome.org) are pleased to announce a $10 million verdict in compensatory damages against Johnson & Johnson's McNeil Consumer Products (NYSE: JNJ) unit on behalf of 13-year-old Brianna Maya and her family. Brianna suffered disfiguring, life-altering skin burns and permanent blindness after she was given Children's Motrin to treat a fever and cough in 2000. (Alicia E. Maya, et al. v. Johnson & Johnson, et al., Case No. 002879, Court of Common Pleas, Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania)

When Brianna was 3 years old, she was given Children's Motrin. Soon after, she developed a rash, skin lesions, eye infections, and lung damage. Her family didn't know at the time that Children's Motrin had been linked to Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis (TEN) and Stevens-Johnson Syndrome (SJS), severe allergic reactions that can cause patients' skin to burn off, leave patients blind and disfigured.  Now 13, Brianna continues to experience the effects of taking the drug, including:

  • blindness in one eye, corneal scarring in both eyes, and recurring eye infections
  • ongoing eye surgeries needed to maintain vision
  • permanent disfigurement to her face, eyelids, and body after 84 percent of her skin was burned when she initially took the medicine
  • permanent lung damage, including a 50 percent loss of lung capacity with recurring lung infections and pneumonia
  • brain damage and recurring seizures
  • internal and external scarring resulting in permanent loss of reproductive system

Jurors deliberated for approximately 10 hours before holding J&J's McNeil Consumer Products unit liable for Brianna's injuries and awarded her $10 million.  

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