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Amsterdam Molecular Therapeutics' Glybera(R) Significantly Reduces the Risk of Pancreatitis in LPLD Patients

Tue, 06/28/2011 - 11:31pm
Bio-Medicine.Org

AMSTERDAM, June 29, 2011 /PRNewswire/ --

Data Presented at the 79thEuropean Atherosclerosis Society Meeting

Amsterdam Molecular Therapeutics (Euronext: AMT), a leader in the field of human gene therapy, today released data showing that its gene therapy Glybera® (alipogene tiparvovec) significantly reduces the risk of pancreatitis in patients with Lipoprotein Lipase Deficiency (LPLD). Pancreatitis, or inflammation of the pancreas, is a major clinical symptom of LPLD. It causes severe abdominal pain and often leads to hospitalization of patients as well as other complications such as diabetes and early atherosclerosis. Data were presented at the 79th European Atherosclerosis Society Meeting (26-29 June 2011, Gothenburg, Sweden).

"These data demonstrate the dramatic impact Glybera can have in the lives of LPLD patients. Pancreatitis is a debilitating and extremely painful condition. Many patients end up in the hospital emergency room and try to control the pain by any means," explained Janneke de Wal, Director of Global Sales & Marketing at AMT. "By reducing the incidence of pancreatitis episodes, Glybera has the potential to help "normalize" the day to day lives of patients affected by this disease and prevent the often frequent trips to hospital."

Study Details

Historical data on hospital presentations due to abdominal pain from 17 patients already treated with Glybera were collected in this case control study. Blinded event assessment was done by an expert adjudication committee using a modified Atlanta Diagnostic Criteria for acute pancreatitis to allow for incomplete historical data. A statistically significant (p=0.0434) reduction in the risk of acute pancreatitis was seen when the period from the first pancreatitis event to administration of Glybera was compared with the post-therapy period (median = 2.9 years). The hazard ratio, a measure of how o

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