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FDA Issues Draft Guidance for Early Version of an Artificial Pancreas System

Mon, 06/20/2011 - 9:41am
Bio-Medicine.Org

SILVER SPRING, Md., June 20, 2011 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today issued draft guidance that will help advance the development and approval of an artificial pancreas system to treat type 1 diabetes in the United States.

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Type 1 diabetes is a chronic condition in which the pancreas produces little or no insulin, a hormone needed to properly control blood glucose (sugar) levels. Without enough insulin, glucose builds up in the bloodstream instead of going into the cells.

People with type 1 diabetes must regulate their blood glucose levels by checking their levels with a glucose meter multiple times daily, calculating how much insulin is needed to lower their blood glucose levels, and administering the necessary dose using a syringe or insulin pump.

An artificial pancreas system is an automated, closed-loop system that combines a continuous glucose monitor, an insulin infusion pump, and a glucose meter for calibrating the monitor. The devices are designed to work together, monitoring the body's glucose levels and automatically pumping appropriate doses of insulin as determined by a computer algorithm.

Today's draft guidance document addresses an early version of an artificial pancreas system, known as a Low Glucose Suspend system.  The Low Glucose Suspend system can help reduce or lessen the severity of a dangerous drop in glucose levels (hypoglycemia) by temporarily reducing or stopping the delivery of insulin. However, patients must still manage their glucose levels with a glucose meter and give themselves insulin, if necessary. The draft guidance provides recommendations for those planning to develop and submit an application for a Low Glucose Suspend (LGS) system intended for single patient use in the home environment.  

The FDA is seeking inp

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