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New Research Validates Results of Previous Studies Demonstrating Tru-D® (Lumalier Corporation) Significantly Reduces Environmental Contamination on Surfaces in Patient Rooms

Fri, 08/12/2011 - 4:45am
Bio-Medicine.Org

MEMPHIS, Tenn., Aug. 12, 2011 /PRNewswire/ -- In an original article coauthored by John M. Boyce, MD; Nancy L. Havill, MT; and Brent A. Moore, PhD, "Terminal Decontamination of Patient Rooms Using an Automated Mobile UV Light Unit" (Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiology, August 2011), the research team from the Hospital of Saint Raphael and the Yale University School of Medicine ". . . demonstrated that an automated, portable UV light device significantly reduced aerobic colony counts on high-touch surfaces in patient rooms. Two previous studies evaluated the ability of the same automated UV light device (Tru-D®; Lumalier) to decontaminate surfaces in laboratory settings and hospital rooms."

All three studies are specific to Tru-D®, a calibrated UV disinfection instrument featuring patented Sensor360™ technology that has undergone rigorous third party clinical testing on more than 100 contaminated hospital rooms under demanding, scientifically controlled conditions. Tru-D® Disinfection is not based on calculated averages or estimates. The Sensor360™ array scans the targeted space to automatically compensate for every unique variable in real time to assure confident disinfection of all environmental surfaces. Company claims have been proven to be repeatable, significantly reducing human error regardless of room configuration or content complexity.

Researchers commented that Tru-D® "was easy to use and required only a few minutes to set up. It does not require constant monitoring because the device turns itself off when a cycle has been completed and does not require sealing of air conditioning or heating vents or doors."

The article concluded that research "confirmed the results of previous studies that demonstrated that (Tru-D®) significantly reduced environmental contamination on surfaces in patient rooms." Although the assessment in the Yale study was more rigorous than previous studies, ". . . th

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