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Rottenstein Law Group Heeds Groundswell of Grievances Against Manufacturers of Defective, Dangerous Hip Replacement Devices

Thu, 08/25/2011 - 3:50am
Bio-Medicine.Org

NEW YORK, Aug. 24, 2011 /PRNewswire/ -- The Rottenstein Law Group, which represents clients with claims stemming from the surgical implantation of hip replacement devices manufactured and sold by DePuy Orthopaedics, a subsidiary of Johnson & Johnson, notes with some concern evidence of a groundswell of grievances stemming from the early failures and other dangers of hip replacement devices and systems.

According to an August 23, 2011, New York Times article, the federal government "has received a surge in complaints in recent months about failed hip replacement [devices], suggesting that serious problems persist with some types of artificial hip even as researchers scramble to evaluate the health dangers."

The Times reportedly performed its own analysis of data accumulated by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), which had since January received more than 5,000 reports about "several widely used devices known as metal-on-metal hips." That number is "more than the agency had received about those devices in the previous four years combined."

And the "vast majority" of those reports received by the FDA "appear to [have come from] patients who have had an all-metal hip removed, or [who] will soon undergo such a procedure because a device failed after only a few years; typically, replacement hips last 15 years or more," according to the Times piece.

The mounting complaints "confirm what many experts have feared -- that all-metal replacement hips are on a trajectory to become the biggest and most costly medical implant problem" since the 2007 recall of a popular heart device. And although "immediate problems with the hip implants are not life-threatening, some patients have suffered crippling injuries caused by tiny particles of cobalt and chromium that the metal devices shed as they wear."

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