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Drug-Driving: Draw the Line Now

Fri, 09/16/2011 - 4:33am
Bio-Medicine.Org

LONDON, September 16, 2011 /PRNewswire/ --

Concateno Welcomes the Campaign to Make Lillian's Law a Reality

On the 7th July, John Page was sentenced to eight months in prison for dangerous driving that led to the death of 14-year-old Lillian Groves. Page's vehicle hit Lillian while she was playing outside her home in Croydon, and he admitted to smoking cannabis prior to the accident. At the time of the accident, police also found a half-smoked cannabis joint in his car.

On the 6th September it was revealed that, while traces of cannabis were found in Page's blood, he avoided a charge of driving under the influence of drugs, which can carry a 14-year sentence, because only low traces of the substance were detected. Lillian's family believes, however, that if Page had been tested at the scene of the accident, rather than nine hours later, he would have been deemed unfit to drive.

Following these events, Lillian Groves' family has initiated a campaign to pass Lillian's Law, which would permit the use of roadside drug testing devices, similar to the breathalysers that are used to screen drivers for alcohol.

Roadside drug testing programmes are already carried out in several countries today, including Australia, Spain, Germany, and Italy. These programmes utilize equipment that enables police to rapidly test motorists for the presence of drugs in saliva. The tests are minimally invasive, and they can be performed in approximately five to ten minutes.  Where implemented, these programmes have served as a deterrent to "drug-driving."

For instance, since the introduction of its roadside drug testing programme in 2004, Victoria, Australia has seen the number of individuals driving under the influence of illicit drugs decrease over a five-year period from one in 44 to one in 94. This statistic very clearly suggests that roadside drug testing is an effective way to reduce drug-driving and contributes

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