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Johnson & Johnson Makes Strong Progress in First Year of Initiative to Improve Health of Millions of Women and Children in the Developing World

Tue, 09/20/2011 - 8:37am
Bio-Medicine.Org

NEW BRUNSWICK, N.J., Sept. 20, 2011 /PRNewswire/ -- Johnson & Johnson (NYSE: JNJ) today announced important progress made in the inaugural year of the Company's comprehensive effort designed to improve the health of as many as 120 million women and children each year in developing countries by 2015.

Since its launch last September, Johnson & Johnson has laid a strong foundation for measurable impact in several areas toward Every Woman, Every Child, the United Nations' Global Strategy for Women's and Children's Health to reduce mortality in women and children by 2015, including: expanding health information for mothers over mobile phones, helping to increase the number of safe births, doubling donations of treatments for intestinal worms in children, helping to ensure that no child is born with HIV, and furthering research and development of new medicines for HIV and tuberculosis (TB).

"Our results should be measured in terms of lives saved over the five years of our commitment, not just in terms of effort or dollars contributed," said Johnson & Johnson Chairman and CEO Bill Weldon. "We responded to the Secretary General's call for action because we aim to make a real and lasting difference for women and children in some of the most challenging areas of the world.  This is the goal to which we are holding ourselves accountable."

First Year Sees Major Expansion of Partnerships, Disease Prevention Efforts

In the first year of this work, Johnson & Johnson created new alliances while strengthening existing ones with many organizations, including non-governmental and community groups, governments, academia and multilateral groups to scale-up proven health interventions. Johnson & Johnson expects to positively affect the lives of millions of women and children through this effort.

"Every Woman, Every Child

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