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LX4211 for Diabetes Shown to Reduce Fasting and Post-Prandial Blood Sugar in Healthy Subjects

Tue, 09/13/2011 - 4:33am
Bio-Medicine.Org

THE WOODLANDS, Texas, Sept. 13, 2011 /PRNewswire/ -- Lexicon Pharmaceuticals, Inc. (Nasdaq: LXRX), a biopharmaceutical company focused on discovering breakthrough treatments for human disease, reported positive data from a recently completed clinical trial and mechanistic study of LX4211, a dual inhibitor of the sodium glucose transporters 1 and 2 (SGLT1 and SGLT2).  The favorable safety profile and effects on multiple parameters of glycemic control and cardiovascular health in healthy normal subjects support the broad potential of LX4211 in the treatment of diabetes and associated metabolic conditions.

"Newly observed in this study were the effects of LX4211, in healthy volunteers, of decreasing postprandial glucose levels without hypoglycemia and substantially reducing triglycerides," said Brian Zambrowicz, Ph.D., executive vice president and chief scientific officer.  "Notably, the magnitudes of the reductions in triglycerides were similar to current standard of care prescription and clinical-stage medicines. By contrast, reported results of SGLT2-selective compounds have demonstrated minimal or no reductions in postprandial glucose in healthy subjects and minimal or no triglyceride decreases in either healthy normal volunteers or patients with type 2 diabetes."

Results from the study demonstrated that the 400 mg solid oral dose of LX4211 compared to placebo significantly reduced mean changes from baseline in fasting plasma glucose (p=0.005) and post-prandial glucose levels (p<0.001) in parallel with meaningful mean increases from baseline in total and active GLP-1 (p=0.055 and p=0.003, respectively) as well as PYY (p<0.001).  GLP-1 is associated with improved glucose control and decreased food intake through reduction of appetite.  PYY is a gas

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