Advertisement
News
Advertisement

NIH-Funded Study Demonstrates That Patients Receiving New CPR Devices (ResQPOD® and ResQPump™) and Cooling Have Improved Long-Term Brain Function Following Cardiac Arrest

Tue, 09/06/2011 - 6:34am
Bio-Medicine.Org

ROSEVILLE, Minn., Sept. 6, 2011 /PRNewswire/ -- Today, Advanced Circulatory Systems Inc. (ACSI) announced results from a large, NIH-funded clinical trial comparing standard cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) to a new method of CPR that provides greater protection to the heart and brain when the heart stops beating (cardiac arrest). Their new device combination, called the ResQCPR™ System, combines an active compression decompression CPR (ACD-CPR) device, called the ResQPump™, and an impedance threshold device (ITD), called the ResQPOD®.  

Additional results from the ResQTrial study have now demonstrated that when the ResQCPR System was used together with therapeutic hypothermia, there was a six-fold increase in the percentage of patients who improved from poor neurologic function at hospital discharge to good neurologic function at 90 days, when compared to standard CPR with hypothermia.

"The striking improvement in patients treated with the ResQCPR System and hypothermia demonstrates the important synergy between the two technologies. These findings provide a new way to significantly decrease the number of patients with poor long-term neurological function, especially when the ResQCPR System is applied early during cardiac arrest," Said Dr. Marvin Wayne, EMS Medical Director of Whatcom County in Washington, and principal author of the study.

The ResQTrial Study evaluated over 5,000 patients in seven different US emergency medical services (EMS) systems to determine the effect of the ResQCPR System on rates of long-term survival with good brain function. The new findings from the study focus on the subset of patients with poor brain function (neurologic outcomes) at the time of hospital discharge. Poor neurological function for survivors after cardiac arrest is an enormous burden for families, patients, and society due to the high health care costs associated with caring for them. About 25 percent of the

'/>"/>

SOURCE

Advertisement

Share this Story

X
You may login with either your assigned username or your e-mail address.
The password field is case sensitive.
Loading