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Prostate Conditions Education Council Opposes U.S. Preventative Services Task Force Recommendation

Mon, 10/10/2011 - 5:34am
Bio-Medicine.Org

DENVER, Oct. 10, 2011 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- The Prostate Conditions Education Council (PCEC) – a national organization committed to men's health and a leader in prostate cancer screening – today announced it strongly opposes the newly released recommendations from the U.S. Preventative Services Task Force (USPSTF). The draft guidance recommends against prostate-specific antigen (PSA) screening for prostate cancer.

PCEC believes that until a more accurate and reliable diagnostic tool exists, the Prostate-Specific Antigen (PSA) test and Digital Rectal Exam (DRE) remain the safest routes to detecting the disease in its earliest stages – when it's most treatable. The PSA test is one of the only tools men have to detect the second leading cause of cancer death among American men,(i) and the USPSTF recommendations could limit access and wide-spread screening.

"As an organization that helps screen thousands of men annually and more than five million in the last 22 years, we have an up-close perspective: listening to men's questions, educating them about the current screening tools and hearing about stories of survival," said Wendy Poage, president of the Prostate Conditions Education Council. "Mortality rates have decreased with the onset of PSA screening and we cannot slip back to an era where all men were diagnosed with advanced disease because no screening was available. While we applaud USPSTF for bringing this issue to a national discussion, we believe that the pendulum has moved too far and that corrections need to be made to help patients navigate this important public health issue."

PCEC's specific recommendations include:

Separating Diagnosis Issue From Treatment Decision Making

PCEC believes that the treatment decision making process should be the key ar

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