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ECRI Institute Puts 10 Technology Issues on its 2012 Watch List for Hospital Executives

Tue, 01/03/2012 - 7:33am
Bio-Medicine.Org

PLYMOUTH MEETING, Pa., Jan. 3, 2012 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- ECRI Institute (www.ecri.org), an independent nonprofit that researches the best approaches to improving patient care, listed 10 health technology issues that hospital leaders should have on their watch lists for 2012. The just-released list takes into account the convergence of critical patient safety, economic, and regulatory pressures currently facing healthcare executives.

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Technology issues on this year's list span a variety of clinical and operational areas, including health IT, cardiovascular implants, minimally invasive surgical advancements, cancer therapies, and imaging and radiology services. According to the report, careful consideration of all the factors affecting whether and how to adopt these interventions will be crucial for short- and long-term strategic planning, cost-effective implementation, and optimal safety and effectiveness for patients.

"Technology is increasingly a top management concern, and is no longer confined to clinical and technical decision making. Themes emerging on our 2012 list reflect ongoing impacts of healthcare reform initiatives and new technology developments that emphasize patient-centered care," says ECRI Institute President and CEO Jeffrey C. Lerner, PhD.

"This list addresses safety improvements, interconnectedness of technology, personalized medicine tailored to individual care characteristics and preferences, and increasing cost pressures," adds Lerner.

ECRI Institute's new report, Top 10 C-Suite Watch List:  Hospital Technology Issues for 2012, available for

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