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ACC's CardioSmart Launches Nation's First Free Cardiovascular Texting Program

Thu, 02/16/2012 - 5:45am
The Associated Press

The American College of Cardiology (ACC) today launched CardioSmartTXTT, the nation's first free texting program to prevent and manage cardiovascular disease. CardioSmartTXT will provide support, information, advice and tips on heart disease prevention as well as disease-specific states.

The ACC introduced two texting channels in the program's launch - CardioSmartTXT PREVENT and CardioSmartTXT QUIT. CardioSmartTXT PREVENT is a six-month program aimed at the proactive prevention of cardiovascular disease and general heart health and wellness.

CardioSmartTXT QUIT is an intensive smoking cessation support program to help users achieve smoking cessation goals.

Users can sign-up for CardioSmartTXT PREVENT or CardioSmartTXT QUIT at www.CardioSmart.org. Additional texting channels will be launched throughout 2012.

CardioSmart is the ACC's patient and consumer education campaign and provides education and resources to the public to help prevent, manage and treat heart disease. Heart disease is the leading cause of death in the United States and modifiable risk factors such as high blood pressure, high cholesterol, obesity and smoking are leading factors for heart disease.

"As the nation's cardiologists, the ACC plays a crucial role in battling this disease and CardioSmartTXT is an important tool in helping to keep America's hearts healthy by engaging with our patients and future patients through their phone or mobile device," said Jack Lewin, MD, CEO of the ACC. "By encouraging and helping everyone to live smarter and healthier lifestyles, we can help save lives." CardioSmartTXT PREVENT users will receive 48 messages over the course of six months. The comprehensive set of messages address: diet, exercise, cholesterol, blood pressure, stress management, community resources, smoking cessation and other cardiovascular disease risk factors. Members of the ACC, including cardiologists and cardiac care nurses, developed content for CardioSmartTXT PREVENT.

CardioSmartTXT QUIT is a two-month program that includes 120 messages focused on craving submission, emotional support, community resources and progress tracking. Content for CardioSmartTXT QUIT was developed by smoking cessation experts in conjunction with the National Cancer Institute, which is a part of the National Institutes of Health.

CardioSmartTXT QUIT is also available in Spanish.

The CardioSmartTXT program is part of the ACC's ongoing efforts to contribute to the goals of Million Hearts, the Department of Health and Human Services' initiative to prevent one million heart attacks and strokes over the next five years. The CardioSmartTXT program will incorporate elements of the Million Hearts ABCS (Aspirin for people at risk; Blood pressure control; Cholesterol management; Smoking cessation), reinforcing nationwide efforts to reduce the burden of heart disease.

The American College of Cardiology is transforming cardiovascular care and improving heart health through continuous quality improvement, patient-centered care, payment innovation and professionalism. The College is a 40,000-member nonprofit medical society comprised of physicians, surgeons, nurses, physician assistants, pharmacists and practice managers, and bestows credentials upon cardiovascular specialists who meet its stringent qualifications. The College is a leader in the formulation of health policy, standards and guidelines, and is a staunch supporter of cardiovascular research. The ACC provides professional education and operates national registries for the measurement and improvement of quality care. More information about the association is available online at www.cardiosource.org/ACC.

SOURCE American College of Cardiology -0- 02/16/2012 /Web Site: http://www.acc.org CO: American College of Cardiology ST: District of Columbia IN: REA HEA TLS WIC EDU HOU SU: PDT PRN -- DC54849 -- 0000 02/16/2012 15:31:37 EDT http://www.prnewswire.c

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