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New Studies Conducted By Spherix Support Use Of D-Tagatose To Reduce And Stabilize Atherosclerotic Plaques

Wed, 04/18/2012 - 1:32pm
Bio-Medicine.Org

BETHESDA, Md., April 18, 2012 /PRNewswire/ -- Spherix Incorporated (NASDAQ: SPEX) - an innovator in biotechnology for therapy in diabetes, metabolic syndrome and atherosclerosis, and provider of technical and regulatory consulting services to food, supplement, biotechnology and pharmaceutical companies - today announced results from its recently completed studies using near-infrared spectroscopy on autopsy samples from humans who had confirmed cardiovascular disease.  Results showed that these atherosclerotic plaques had abnormally high amounts of macrophages and reduced levels of collagen and elastin.  Reducing collagen and elastin weakens the plaques and contributes to plaque rupture, myocardial infarction and/or stroke (see photo).[1]

(Photo:  http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20120418/PH90198

Importantly, these findings show the relevance of Spherix's newly completed study involving D-tagatose and LDLR-/- mice, which are predisposed to developing atherosclerosis and mimic the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis in humans. Similar to what was found in the human study, infrared spectrometric imaging of diseased vascular samples from mice given an atherogenic diet containing high amounts of sucrose showed increases in macrophages and reductions in collagen and elastin content. The mice fed an atherogenic diet containing D-tagatose but not sucrose showed significantly fewer plaques and infrared spectrometric imaging of the plaques that developed revealed fewer macrophages, and more collagen and elastin. These results suggest that D-tagatose not only reduces the number of plaques formed, but also may stabilize atherosclerotic plaques.

LDL cholesterol particles imbedded within atherosclerotic plaques have been reported to attract circulating monocytes into the lesion, thereby leading to the accumulation of macrophages in the plaque and weakening

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