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Learned helplessness: Millennials and electronic medical records

Thu, 06/28/2012 - 9:30am
Mass Device

As I read more about the Millennials, the generation to which I myself belong, I'm starting to see a connection between their attitude toward the world and the problems plaguing healthcare IT, an industry I research for a living.

Millennials (by one definition, people born between 1981 and 2000) tend to perceive greatness as something that is inherent, not acquired. This fallacy comes in part from the coddling we were given as young people. Millennials received trophies just for participating. Thanks to grade inflation in college, we could sleep through classes and still earn a B. We were told we were special: Success came to us simply by showing up.

This type of attitude leads to inevitable discouragement post-college, when Millennials are faced with challenges they haven't been prepared to handle. Jobs aren't handed out just because the applicant has a degree, but instead require connections or specialized skills or experience, and once in those jobs, success doesn't come automatically. When he doesn't face immediate success, the Millennial assumes that he's "different" than the successful people, and attributes the failure to an intrinsic, unchangeable quality rather than faulty methods.

Pretty soon this leads to learned helplessness. Rather than apply the daily, frustrating effort required to solve a difficult problem, we tend to leave it to those who were meant for that kind of life.

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