Advertisement
News
Advertisement

Science Translational Medicine and the DMM Global Foundation Announce Days of Molecular Medicine 2012 "The Translational Science of Rare Diseases: From Rare To Care."

Fri, 07/13/2012 - 1:28pm
Bio-Medicine.Org

WASHINGTON, July 13, 2012 /PRNewswire-iReach/ -- Science Translational Medicine, the newest journal from the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), and the Days of Molecular Medicine Global Foundation (DMM GF) announced today the launch of Days of Molecular Medicine 2012 "The Translational Science of Rare Diseases: From Rare to Care," a three-day meeting which will be held in Vienna, Austria from October 8 through October 10, 2012.

Taking place at the Palais de Lichtenstein, and featuring an international roster of academic, industrial and government scientists, headlined by Nobel Laureate Dr. Eric Kandel, the meeting will cover how new technologies are providing fresh insights into the causes of rare diseases and ways forward for developing new treatments.

Featured topics include a new targeted therapy for cystic fibrosis, exon skipping for treating muscular dystrophy, gene therapy for SCID and hemophilia, tailoring treatments with genomics, and embryonic stem cell therapy for treating retinal diseases. Joining Science Translational Medicine, AAAS and the DMM Global Foundation in launching Days of Molecular Medicine 2012 are the following co-organizers: the Institute of Molecular Biotechnology of the Austrian Academy of Sciences (IMBA), Ludwig Maximilians University Munich, the Karolinska Institute, and Fondation Ipsen.

Days of Molecular Medicine 2012 is also made possible through the generous sponsorship of Boehringer Ingleheim, Inc.

"The Days of Molecular Medicine 2012 conference will discuss the many different causes of rare diseases," says Orla Smith, Managing Editor of Science Translational Medicine, "and the diverse roster of speakers will provide fresh insights into how we can develop effective new treatments."

"From cystic fibrosis to hemophilia, there are a number of diseases that, while classified as "rare", afflict a significant number of people worldwide," says Ken Chien, DMM Global Foundation D
'/>"/>

Advertisement

Share this Story

X
You may login with either your assigned username or your e-mail address.
The password field is case sensitive.
Loading