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Tibion Introduces World's First Wireless 'Bionic Leg'

Wed, 08/29/2012 - 10:42am

Patients who can't use their legs from the effects of multiple sclerosis, stroke, traumatic brain injury, partial spinal cord injury and other debilitating conditions have been given a new 'leg up' with the introduction of the only wearable, lower limb, robotic trainer activated by the patient's intent to move - the Tibion Bionic Leg.

The new, robotic, trainer aids in the rehabilitation of patients suffering from lower extremity immobility associated with a wide variety of incapacitating conditions.

"The Tibion Bionic Leg is unlike anything being used for the rehabilitation of lower extremities," said Charles Remsberg, CEO of Tibion, Inc. "We've seen a dramatic improvement in the mobility of nearly every patient who has used the device, and we're eager to continue empowering people with the tools necessary to regain their independence and mobility."

The Tibion Bionic Leg is currently being used by clinical therapists on the mobility impaired, and is designed to strengthen stance, improve gait, and enhance active motor learning - while protecting its users from falls and other injuries associated with rehabilitation. It provides patients with the assistance they need to be able to participate more actively in the standard sit-to-stand, overground walking and stair-climbing exercises that are critical to recovery of gait and balance.

The device is triggered by a sensor in the foot which requires patients to shift their weight to the affected limb before it will engage and assist the user in standing. This process has resulted in patients relearning how to use their affected limb much faster than with traditional methods alone.

"There is nothing like seeing the look on a patient's face after they stand for the first time in a Tibion leg," said Kay Wing, founder of Swan Rehab in Phoenix, Ariz. "You're not just giving them a greater potential for a positive outcome, you're giving them hope."

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