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Philips continues to improve access to treatment for common cause of death in the U.S. with the delivery of its one-millionth AED

Wed, 09/12/2012 - 1:10pm
Bio-Medicine.Org

BOTHELL, Wash., Sept. 12, 2012 /PRNewswire/ -- Royal Philips Electronics (NYSE: PHG, AEX: PHI), a pioneer in developing treatments to combat sudden cardiac arrest (SCA), today announced it will donate the one-millionth HeartStart automated external defibrillator (AED) manufactured to Everett Mountain Rescue Unit (EMRU) of Snohomish, Wash. EMRU is a volunteer search and rescue organization serving Snohomish County, Wash., also the location of Philips' HeartStart headquarters.

The one-millionth AED marks a major milestone in Philips' more than 50 year legacy of cardiac resuscitation and innovations to combat the potentially fatal effects of SCA, a condition that claims the lives of approximately seven million people globally every year.[i]  Philips will also make AED donations to nine other local search and rescue organizations, including Snohomish County Volunteer Search and Rescue (SCVSAR) and eight groups associated with the Washington Mountain Rescue Association (WMRA).

"We pride ourselves on expanding public access to AEDs so that virtually anyone can have the power to help save a life," said Mike Mancuso, executive vice president and CEO, Philips Patient Care and Clinical Informatics. "Experts at Philips have worked with community-based early defibrillation champions and resuscitation health care leaders to drive early defibrillation program best practices, and have helped establish defibrillation programs at the top U.S. airlines and the nation's busiest hospitals. We are dedicated to saving lives and overjoyed that so many HeartStart AEDs are now available across the globe for emergency situations."

Philips is the worldwide leader for AEDs, with a resuscitation legacy dating back to 1961. The introduction of the ForeRunner AED in 1996 was one of the main catalysts for the public access defibrillation movement that also included legislation to improve public access to AEDs in the U.S., Japan, France, the United Kingdom, Australia

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