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Foundation Venture Capital Group Invests In Start-Up Working to Reduce Side Effects of Parkinson's Treatment

Fri, 01/25/2013 - 1:29pm
Bio-Medicine.Org

NEW BRUNSWICK, N.J., Jan. 25, 2013 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Parkinson's disease affects one million people in the United States and seven million worldwide. While L-Dopa is effective in treating the disease symptoms, the vast majority of patients taking it chronically eventually develop L-Dopa Induced Dyskinesia (LID), abnormal involuntary movements that can be disabling.

A new company, MentiNova, Inc., is exploring an oral medication that could reduce these uncontrollable, often chaotic movements in patients being treated with L-Dopa.  Foundation Venture Capital Group (FVCG), a New Jersey Health Foundation affiliate, has committed up to $500,000 to advance this research and development. 

According to James M. Golubieski , president of FVCG, the investment in MentiNova will allow the company to advance the status of its IND (Investigational New Drug) filing with the FDA and to perform clinical trials testing the efficacy of the treatment.

Dr. M. Maral Mouradian , the William Dow Lovett Professor of Neurology and Director of the Center for Neurodegenerative and Neuroimmunologic Diseases at the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School in Piscataway, NJ, is a co-founder of the company.

Dr. Mouradian said MentiNova's focus at this time is to use a drug that is currently clinically approved and repurpose it for the treatment of LID in patients with Parkinson's disease.

"Once we can prove positive results for using this medication for patients with Parkinson's disease suffering from L-Dopa Induced Dyskinesia, we hope to be able to test it for expanded usage in patients with other conditions that are characterized by involuntary movements such as Tourette's syndrome, Huntington's disease and Tardive Dyskinesia," said Dr. Mouradian.

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