Advertisement
News
Advertisement

Many Americans Do Some Self-Tracking, But Mostly It's in Their Heads

Mon, 01/28/2013 - 5:34pm
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

A report out today from the Pew Internet and American Life Project finds that seven out of 10 American adults track some kind of health measure. Weight, diet, and exercise are the most commonly monitored details, while some trackers keep a close eye on their own or a loved one’s conditions by watching health indicators such as blood-sugar levels or headaches.

The phone-based survey asked 3,014 U.S. adults about their self-tracking habits. One surprising finding was that nearly 50 percent of trackers in the survey say they do it in their head. Study author Susannah Fox calls these trackers the “skinny jeans trackers”—people who pay attention to whether or not their pants fit (who doesn’t do that?).

From the report:

This makes some sense since all someone might need to track their weight is a scale — or even a pair of jeans that only fit if someone is at their target weight. This finding is, however, a challenge to technology developers who would like to convince people to upgrade their habits. In order to capture this segment of the market they must strive to create a tool that is as seamless as keeping track in your head.

Advertisement

Share this Story

X
You may login with either your assigned username or your e-mail address.
The password field is case sensitive.
Loading