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Tattoo-Like Sensor Measures Glucose Levels Without Painful Finger Prick

January 14, 2015 11:02 am | Comments

Scientists have developed the first ultra-thin, flexible device that sticks to skin like a rub-on tattoo and can detect a person's glucose levels. The sensor, reported in a proof-of-concept study in the ACS journal Analytical Chemistry, has...

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Using DNA 'Glue' To Build Tissues and Organs

January 14, 2015 10:54 am | Comments

DNA molecules provide the "source code" for life in humans, plants, animals and some microbes. But now researchers report an initial study showing that the strands can also act as a glue to hold together 3-D-printed materials that could someday...

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University and Hospitals Collaborate to Find Healthcare Solutions

January 14, 2015 9:58 am | Comments

A prototype for doing a skin biopsy in 5 minutes and a simulator for training doctors in minimally invasive surgery are some of the innovative projects in the process of being patented that have arisen from the relationship between the university...

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Measuring Concussion Forces in the Greatest Detail Yet

January 14, 2015 9:33 am | Comments

More than 40 million people worldwide suffer from concussions each year, but scientists are just beginning to understand the traumatic forces that cause the injury. Now a team of engineers and physicians at Stanford has provided the...

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Computer Model Calculates Public Response to Disease Outbreaks

January 14, 2015 9:19 am | Comments

Sometimes the response to the outbreak of a disease can make things worse — such as when people panic and flee, potentially spreading the disease to new areas. The ability to anticipate when such overreactions might occur could help public...

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First Contracting Human Muscle Grown in a Lab

January 14, 2015 9:08 am | Comments

In a laboratory first, Duke researchers have grown human skeletal muscle that contracts and responds just like native tissue to external stimuli such as electrical pulses, biochemical signals and pharmaceuticals. The lab-grown tissue should soon...

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Device Manipulates Differentiating Stem Cells

January 14, 2015 8:51 am | Comments

Electroporation is a powerful technique in molecular biology. By using an electrical pulse to create a temporary nanopore in a cell membrane, researchers can deliver chemicals, drugs, and DNA directly into a single cell. But existing electroporation...

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Video Game Technology Measures Movement in Muscular Dystrophy Patients

January 13, 2015 2:00 pm | Comments

Researchers at Nationwide Children's Hospital have developed a way to measure upper extremity movement in patients with muscular dystrophy using interactive video game technology. Their hope is to expand inclusion criteria for clinical trials...

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'NanoVelcro' Extracts and Analyzes Tumor Cells

January 13, 2015 1:52 pm | Comments

An international group led by scientists at UCLA’s California NanoSystems Institute has developed a new method for effectively extracting and analyzing cancer cells circulating in patients’ blood. Circulating tumor cells are cancer cells that...

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Nanolaser Biosensor Could Detect Biomarkers of Cancer or Alzheimer's

January 13, 2015 11:53 am | Comments

A simple method to sense DNA, as well as potential biomarker proteins of cancer or other diseases such as Alzheimer’s, may soon be within reach – thanks to the work of a team of Yokohama National University researchers in Japan. As the team...

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Wearable Sensors Gather Lots of Data…Now to Make It Useful

January 13, 2015 11:27 am | Comments

It's not just about how many steps you've taken or how many calories you've burned in a day. Wearable fitness trackers and health monitors are becoming more commonplace and diverse, but just what do you do with all of that data? "We have a lot...

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Environmentally Friendly Cold Plasma Removes Resistant Norovirus

January 13, 2015 11:21 am | Comments

Treating surfaces with cold atmospheric pressure plasma (CAPP) may reduce the risk of transmitting norovirus, a contagious virus leading to stomach pain, nausea and diarrhea, according to a new study. The work, published this week in mBio...

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Glass Microbubbles Provide Low-Cost CD4+ T Cell Testing

January 13, 2015 11:07 am | Comments

Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) disease represents a global health problem concern in the world especially in many areas of Africa. According to the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV and AIDS (UNAIDS), there were 24.7 million people...

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App Conducts Research on Breast Cancer and Alzheimer's While Your Phone Charges

January 13, 2015 10:45 am | Comments

Your smartphone is already great for sending email, checking sports scores and sharing photos of your lunch. Now it can help battle cancer, Alzheimer's and other diseases, thanks to a new app developed by Stanford scientists and Sony. The...

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Microfluidic Device Observes T Cell Interaction

January 13, 2015 10:02 am | Comments

The immune system is a complex network of many different cells working together to defend against invaders. Successfully fighting off an infection depends on the interactions between these cells. A new device developed by MIT engineers offers...

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