Advertisement
News
Advertisement

American Association for Cancer Research to Host Congressional Briefing About Progress in Cancer Research

Thu, 02/07/2013 - 4:50pm
AACR

 

  • Deputy Director of the National Cancer Institute, Dr. Douglas Lowy, will address the audience.
  • Event will showcase the AACR Cancer Progress Report, which is a call to action to make funding for the National Institutes of Health a national priority.
  • A foremost expert in blood cancers will describe progress in multiple myeloma.

WASHINGTON, D.C. — The American Association for Cancer Research will host a congressional briefing to highlight recent progress in cancer research and biomedical science, and call on Congress to avoid automatic cuts that would deal a devastating blow to the National Institutes of Health and National Cancer Institute.

The briefing will take place on Tuesday, Feb. 12, from 12-1:30 p.m. ET, in the Rayburn House Office Building, Room B-339. Reporters who wish to attend can register by contacting Jeremy Moore at jeremy.moore@aacr.org or (215) 446-7109.

AACR CEO Margaret Foti, Ph.D., M.D. (h.c.), will moderate the following distinguished panel of speakers:

  • Sen. Jerry Moran, R-Kan. (Invited)
  • Douglas R. Lowy, M.D., deputy director of the National Cancer Institute (NCI)
  • Anna D. Barker, Ph.D., professor and director of the Transformative Healthcare Networks and co-director of Complex Adaptive Systems Research at Arizona State University
  • Kenneth C. Anderson, M.D., director of the Jerome Lipper Multiple Myeloma Center at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Kraft Family professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School
  • The Honorable M. Robert Carr, multiple myeloma survivor and former U.S. Representative from Michigan

During the briefing, panelists will present key advances in cancer research and cancer care as described in the AACR Cancer Progress Report 2012 and will highlight specific advances since the report in blood cancers like multiple myeloma.

Panelists will also discuss key initiatives at the NCI and the critical importance of funding to save more lives.

Topics

Advertisement

Share this Story

X
You may login with either your assigned username or your e-mail address.
The password field is case sensitive.
Loading