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Study of Infants in Neonatal ICU Shows Low BPA Exposures Are Well Within Safe Limits

Sun, 02/17/2013 - 12:27pm
Bio-Medicine.Org

WASHINGTON, Feb. 18, 2013 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- A study published today in Pediatrics attempted to determine whether feeding sources (breast milk or formula) or needed medical devices were the sources of BPA exposure among premature infants under medical care in a hospital intensive care unit.  The study authors, Duty, et. al, tested urine samples from infants to determine exposure levels and noted whether the infants were exposed to "high-intensity" or "low-intensity" treatment with medical devices. The following statement on the topic can be attributed to Steven G. Hentges , Ph.D., of the Polycarbonate/BPA Global Group of the American Chemistry Council.

"Balancing the benefits and risks of any medical treatment is especially important when an infant's life is at stake and this study found that exposures to BPA from the use of life-saving medical equipment on premature infants in the NICU were low and well within safe limits established by regulators. The findings are consistent with an earlier study from some of the same researchers, which noted: 'More impor­tant, our findings suggest that even premature infants have some capacity to conjugate (process) BPA.'  Combined with more extensive studies, the available evidence indicates that even premature infants have the capability to quickly metabolize and eliminate BPA from the body, similar to adults."

"The BPA exposures for all of the infants in this study are short-term, limited to the time when life-saving medical treatment is necessary, and well below government-set safe intake limits for BPA, which are conservatively set. The authors acknowledge that exposures were 'below the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency reference dose (RfD) (dose below which no adverse health effects should result from a lifetime of exposure)."


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