Advertisement
News
Advertisement

Patients and Physicians Express Desire to Switch to Transdermal Drug Delivery, Finds Frost & Sullivan

Thu, 07/11/2013 - 7:51am
PR Newswire

The $82 billion U.S. drug delivery market is showing no signs of saturation, with major patent expiries, generic competition, tightening Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulations, and emerging drug delivery systems continuing to provide momentum. Among the 15 drug delivery systems surveyed by Frost & Sullivan, physicians prefer topical delivery, either as a transdermal patch or topical gel/cream, and expressed willingness to switch their current mode of therapy to one available in these forms.

A new end-user survey of more than 220 physicians and 650 patients by Frost & Sullivan, the Drug Delivery Technology: End-User Preferences, Utilization and Perceptions analysis (http://www.lifesciences.frost.com), finds that regardless of disease area, physicians select drug delivery methods that drive consistent patient compliance and effective outcomes. The survey traces usage patterns, analyzes preferences and opportunities among physicians and patients, and assesses their willingness to switch therapies based on the drug delivery method.

DRUG DELIVERY METHODS AND DISEASE TYPES COVERED

Delivery Method

Disease Type

Oral drug delivery

Type 1 diabetes

Nasal drug delivery

Type 2 diabetes

Transdermal drug delivery

Obesity

Topical drug delivery

Deep vein thrombosis

Subcutaneous injection (autoinjector)

Arterial thrombosis

Subcutaneous injection (prefilled syringe)

Atrial fibrillation/arrhythmia

Intramuscular injection (autoinjector)

Ischemic heart disease

Intramuscular injection (prefilled syringe)

Migraines

Intradermal injection

Multiple Sclerosis

Intravenous injection

ADHD

Intravenous infusion

Schizophrenia

Implantable infusion pump

Alzheimer's disease

External infusion pump

Depression

Implant

Ulcerative colitis

Rectal drug delivery

Crohn's disease

 

Topics

Advertisement

Share this Story

X
You may login with either your assigned username or your e-mail address.
The password field is case sensitive.
Loading