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Crowdfunding Campaign for 'Smart' Breast Health Imaging Device

Tue, 08/20/2013 - 11:01am
The Associated Press

Eclipse Breast Health Technologies Inc., a health products design and development company, today announced Eclipse is executing a crowd sourcing campaign on Indiegogo to raise $650,000 to bring Eclipse to the market as soon as possible so it can benefit women in early detection of breast abnormalities, by tracking and comparing images from month to month. The campaign can be found at http://igg.me/at/eclipsebreasthealth/x/4229628.

The Eclipse is a safe at-home, easy to use hand-held imaging device that enables consumers to perform a self-administered breast exam to detect breast abnormalities. It is up to five times more sensitive than the human hand; therefore resulting in improving the effectiveness of a tactile examination and giving women comfort and peace of mind of their breast health status between mammography visits. This is the world's first personal handheld device that creates digital images for women and their health care providers to monitor and help identify potential problems, resulting in early detection by being able to "see" what can't be felt.

It is estimated that that nearly 40,000 women will die of breast cancer this year in the U.S. alone. "Providing an effective means of early detection that leads to early treatment is essential in the fight against breast cancer," said Ken Wright founder and CEO of Eclipse Breast Heath Technologies. "I am deeply motivated to make a better future for my wife and daughter and generations of women ahead. The Eclipse is a powerful tool that puts breast health in the hands of women to simply monitor their own breast health to detect change or abnormalities early."

The funds raised through Indiegogo will help Eclipse move their working prototypes into beta pilot production that will put Eclipse into the hands of 1,000 women by Q1 2014 to get critical user feedback that will help improve the Eclipse and drive its full production in Q4 2014. Wright said, "The goal is to have Eclipse in the hands of more than a million women by the end of 2015 and beyond 20 million within five years. We also want to create and distribute thousands of community kits for developing countries by the end of 2015 and hundreds of thousands within five years."

The company will also be working to expand on its advanced technology with plans to make it available to the medical community to help radically improve current mammography systems and to develop programs to empower woman and their doctors to work together to deliver the most comprehensive breast health systems. 

About the Eclipse Product Family
The Eclipse product family is an ecosystem that monitors, evaluates, warns and supports women consumers and their physicians through innovation technology, a service built on modern cloud computing infrastructure and a social network with rapid viral expansion potential. The complete solution includes:

The Eclipse at-home easy-to-use breast self-examination imaging device  The Pink Cloud - A social network that provides an ecosystem for access to the consumers data, analysis and collective insight from other participants  An Image Review Service that uses the latest in computer-assisted screening. 

The Eclipse
The Eclipse combines patent-pending imaging and sensor technology into a simple and safe system that enables women to easily monitor their breast health. The Eclipse uses no radiation or invasive technology, so women are able to use the Eclipse as often as they like without any risk of side effects. Scans are done by applying moderate pressure while sliding the device in an overlapping pattern across the breast to produce a series of high-resolution deep-tissue images. These images are then automatically stitched back together to create one whole image of each breast for easy reviewing.

Images are created with TransPhotonic technology, a technology inspired by Ken Wright while co-engineering a system for US Navy submarines to "see" in murky-water and identify targeted objects and obstructions down to a molecular level. TransPhotonic technology uses the combination of sensors and low-level photons that closely mimic the human touch. The sensors are up to 5 times more sensitive than fingers, enabling the Eclipse to discover and capture images of small masses that could otherwise go undetected in a traditional manual self-exam.

"I believe this is a great advancement for breast cancer and perhaps beyond to other areas of the body," said Dr. Han Chiu MD, Stanford School of Medicine. "It's as safe as using your own finger tips only much more sensitive and effective. There hasn't been anything like this for breast health which gives me as a physician quantifiable data to be more objective while also adding to better patient interaction."

To view the images captured by Eclipse, users transfer the images to the Eclipse software on a computer or to a user's Pink Cloud account. Users can do this by connecting the Eclipse with a USB cable or wireless connection.

The Pink Cloud
The Pink Cloud is a networked breast health social ecosystem of Eclipse users. When a user activates their Eclipse, they automatically receive a Pink Cloud account. This service streamlines a women's ability to monitor her breast health. Images generated using the Eclipse are automatically uploaded to her personal, private account. Depending on the user's preference, each woman may choose to keep her images private, share them with her doctor or anonymously share them with other members of the Pink Cloud community. 

Pink Cloud is a safe, anonymous, member-only community. It brings together the combined wisdom of women who have taken control of their breast health. Once logged in women can:

Access a secure area to upload and store scans directly from Eclipse. Once uploaded they can share their scans with their doctor or subscribe to the Eclipse automated image review service in which imaging software and medical experts provide an analysis of their scans Schedule automatic email and text reminders about self-exams Join our social network where users can learn and share advice on how to better use the Eclipse, promote good breast-health practices and inspire other women to be proactive about their breast health. Users can also download iPhone and Android apps for their smart phone and tablets to access their Pink Cloud anytime.

The Eclipse Image Review Service
The Image Review Service utilizes both clinical and computer-assisted tools to provide professional tracking of a women's Eclipse or digital breast self-exams. The subscription-based service analyses the uploaded image data, tracks abnormal features and makes recommendations to further seek medical attention. In addition, the service can work with the woman's physician to provide time-sensitive data either by generating regular reports or by having the doctor's office access images uploaded on the Pink Cloud directly.

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