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Photos of the Day: Scanning for Eye Disease

Fri, 12/20/2013 - 12:02pm
The Optical Society


Photographs of the power grip style (A-B) and camcorder style designs (C-D) of the prototype OCT scanner. Both devices acquire 3D OCT images of the retina. (Credit: Biomedical Optics Express)


A high-definition OCT image of the retina allows clinicians to non-invasively visualize the 3D structure of key regions, such as the macula (region near the fovea) and optic nerve head, to screen for signs of disease pathology. Shown here is a wide-field view (A) as well as detailed vertical cross-sections (B), (C) and (D) and a circular cross-section (E). (Credit: Biomedical Optics Express)

Flythrough of 3D OCT volumetric data showing sequential cross sections of the normal retina. 3D OCT provides comprehensive information about retinal structure, enabling early detection of disease. (Wide field 10 x 10 mm2, 350 x 350 A-scan motion corrected OCT volume generated from two scanned volumes acquired in 1.4 seconds each.) (Credit: James Fujimoto, MIT)

En-face flythrough of 3D OCT volumetric data. This alternate display of the same 3D data set shows progressively deeper images sectioning through the retina. (Wide field 10 x 10 mm2, 350 x 350 A-scan motion corrected volume generated from two scanned volumes acquired in 1.4 seconds each.) (Credit: James Fujimoto, MIT)

Read: Early Detection of Blinding Eye Disease Could be as Easy as Scanning a Barcode

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