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Retina Implant AG's Clinical Trial Results Presented for the First Time at Spain's Leading Ophthalmology Congress

Mon, 03/10/2014 - 5:27am
The Associated Press

Retina Implant AG, the leading developer of subretinal implants for patients blinded by retinitis pigmentosa (RP), today announced that  Angelika Braun, clinical engineer at Retina Implant AG, presented results from the Company's multicenter clinical trial for the first time in Spain at the XVII Congreso de Sociedad Espanola de Retina y Vitreo (SERV) 2014. SERV 2014 took place 7-8 March at the Palacio de Exposiciones y Congresos de Sevilla in Sevilla, Spain.

As part of the trial, study participants were implanted with Retina Implant's Alpha IMS device, a small, wireless microchip that is implanted below the retina, specifically in the macular region. The microchip mimics the function of the photoreceptors within the eye and has shown to restore partial vision to those blinded for years, allowing them to perceive light, detect motion, read letters and perform daily tasks with improved acuity and mobility in everyday life.

Braun's presentation, "Ver con un implante electronico subretinal en la vida diaria," featured results from a subset of nine patients in the trial. Functional vision was restored in the majority of these patients, enabling improved function in everyday life. Examples include the ability to recognize faces, distinguish objects such as telephones and read signs on doors. Results of these nine patients were also published in the renowned peer-reviewed journal, Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, in February 2013.

"Sharing the learnings and results from Retina Implant's clinical trial with new scientific audiences, such as leading ophthalmologists in Spain, is a critical next step to furthering knowledge of retinal implants and their potential to transform the lives of patients living with RP," said Angelika Braun, clinical engineer at Retina Implant AG.

"Forums like SERV 2014 are ideal for creating awareness and interest in subretinal implant technology, laying the foundation for important clinical partnerships to advance use of the technology." "Our current focus is on increasing patient access to our subretinal microchip in key European markets," said Walter-G Wrobel, CEO of Retina Implant. "Spain is both an important hub for the ophthalmology community and a market where the Alpha IMS is approved for use, making it one of our top priorities." Braun's presentation was one of 14 presentations at the Congreso de SERV, a large annual congress attended by top ophthalmologists and other eye specialists within the Spanish community. The meeting showcases free papers, roundtables and lectures on developments of the SERV, a nonprofit scientific society that aims to educate the public on visual health as well as promote prevention and early treatment of retinal disorders with excellence in care, research and education.

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