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Photos of the Day: Stroke Seeking Helmet

Thu, 06/19/2014 - 10:19am
Chalmers University of Technology


The antennas of the helmet sequentially transmit weak microwave signals into the brain. At the same time, the receiving antennas listen for reflected signals. The brain's different structures and substances affect the microwave scattering and reflections in different ways. The received signals give a complex pattern, which is interpreted with the help of advanced algorithms.


Pictured is the prototype of Strokefinder used in the patient studies at Sahlgrenska University Hospital. Presently, a mobile stroke helmet is being completed and will be used for testing the equipment in ambulances. Pictured from left: Jan Lundmark (Ambulans och Prehospital Akutsjukvård, SU), Mikael Persson (professor i medicinsk teknik, Chalmers), Mikael Elam (professor och överläkare i klinisk neurofysiologi), Sandra Carlsson (forskningssjuksköterska, SU), Miriam K Holmström (forskningssjuksköterska, SU), Jan-Erik Karlsson (överläkare Neurologi/Stroke, SU). (Credit: Henrik Mindedal)


Pictured is the prototype of Strokefinder used in the clinical studies. Presently, a mobile stroke helmet is being completed and will be used for testing the equipment in ambulance. Andreas Fhager at Chalmers University of Technology is one of the researchers who is developing the mobile stroke helmet.


The Strokefinder system (Credit: Jan-Olof Yxell)


Developers Mikael Persson and Andreas Fhager with the Strokefinder (Credit: Jan-Olof Yxell)

Read: Strokefinder Quickly Differentiates Bleeding Strokes from Clot-Induced Strokes

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