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Where Are The 'Hackers' Now?

July 20, 2010 7:35 am | Comments

In his 1984 book, Hackers: Heroes of the Computer Revolution, author Steven Levy profiled some of the personalities whose work brought PCs to the people, including Bill Gates and Steve Jobs. Levy discusses his book, recently reissued, and hacker ethics in the Internet age.

Smart Fibers Could Bring Smarter Clothes

July 20, 2010 7:35 am | Comments

We have smart cars and smart phones, why not smart clothes? They might be coming soon. Materials scientist Yoel Fink describes his work developing fibers that take photos, listen and transmit sound. He says a shirt may one day monitor your health by tracking body sounds.

Beach Season For Horseshoe Crabs

July 20, 2010 7:35 am | Comments

Each summer, horseshoe crabs (Limulus polyphemus) along the Atlantic shore crawl onto beaches to mate and lay eggs -- making now a good time for marine scientists like John Tanacredi to monitor population size. Science Friday visits a New York beach to catch a glimpse of the action.

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Are Protons Even Smaller Than We Thought?

July 20, 2010 7:35 am | Comments

An international team of physicists reexamined the radius of a proton, and found it to be 4 percent smaller than previously thought. Are they mistaken, or is something missing from the long-held theory of quantum electrodynamics? Physicist Brian Odom of Northwestern University discusses.

Harold Varmus Returns To Politics

July 20, 2010 7:34 am | Comments

The Nobel Prize winner and former NIH director has received another presidential appointment: director of the National Cancer Institute. Ira Flatow and Varmus discuss the intersection of politics and science, the genetics of cancer and the process by which basic research becomes medicine.

Climate Scientists Move Forward After Scandal

July 20, 2010 7:34 am | Comments

Last December, e-mails written by climate scientists raised suspicion of scientific misconduct and conspiracy. International investigations have since exonerated the scientists of accusations of manipulating data. New York Times contributor Andrew Revkin explains what happened.

Futures in Biotech 63: How To Use A Mouse

July 12, 2010 11:39 am | Comments

Host: Marc Pelletier Nobel Laureate Dr. Mario Capecchi teaches us how to use a mouse to dissect the human genome and understand disease. Guest: Mario Capecchi, Ph.D., Distinguished Professor of Human Genetics and Biology at the University of Utah, and Investigator with the Howard Hughes...

More Evidence Of A Wet Past On Mars

July 12, 2010 11:39 am | Comments

Using data collected by the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, researchers say they’ve found evidence that more of Mars than previously thought was once covered by water. Science News astronomy writer Ron Cowen describes the research and other recent news about Mars and its watery past.

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Presidential Panel Scrutinizes Synthetic Biology

July 12, 2010 11:39 am | Comments

Scientists are cutting and pasting genes to create engineered organisms that may yield new vaccines and biofuels, but what are the ethical implications of toying with DNA? Geneticist George Church discusses synthetic biology, and why scientists need to be careful with the technology.

A Chemical Nurtures New Brain Cells In Rodents

July 12, 2010 11:39 am | Comments

Scientists screened nearly 1,000 chemicals and found one that nurtures new neurons in rat and mice brains. University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center biochemist Steven McKnight describes the work and explains what has to happen before the chemical can be tried in humans.

The Amygdaloids Mix Neuroscience And Rock 'N' Roll

July 12, 2010 11:39 am | Comments

A group of New York University neuroscientists leads an unlikely double life -- as rockers. The songs on their new album, Theory of My Mind, are based on the members' research. The musicians play selections from the album and talk about the science behind the lyrics.

Swimming Pool Chemistry ... Not Pretty

July 12, 2010 11:39 am | Comments

With a heat wave scorching the Northeast, a dip in the pool may sound like just what the doctor ordered. But before diving in, consider the chemistry. Engineer Ernest Blatchley reveals many things you didn't want to know about swimming pools and the chemical reactions occurring in them.

Spotting Summer Sickness In The Garden

July 12, 2010 11:39 am | Comments

It’s summertime but the living isn’t easy for everything. Plants are under attack by blight, wilt, rust and newcomer downy mildew, which kills basil. Plant pathologist Margaret McGrath runs through symptoms of plant sickness and shares tips for preserving pesto prospects.

Where The Word 'Genome' Came From

July 12, 2010 11:39 am | Comments

In 1920, a botanist named Hans Winkler merged the Greek words "genesis" and "soma" to describe a body of genes. On this episode of Science Diction, historian Howard Markel discusses the word "genome" and how it became the most popular way of describing all of our genetic material.

Helping Those With Hearing Loss Get In The Loop

July 2, 2010 8:39 pm | Comments

A simple technology called a magnetic hearing loop allows wearers of specially outfitted hearing aids to get a wireless signal transmitted directly to their ear. The technology transforms garbled PA sounds into clear announcements. Hearing-impaired user David Myers explains.

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